Washington Post

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  • Wait, is the Kentucky Senate race over or not?

    The Fix
    Chris Cillizza
    21 Oct 2014 | 1:02 pm
    Just when you — and national Democrats, who stopped advertising in the state last week — thought the Kentucky Senate race was over, it's pulling you back in! That's because of the new Bluegrass Poll, sponsored by a conglomerate of Kentucky media outlets, that shows the race as a statistical dead heat between Sen. Mitch McConnell (R) […]
  • Judicial elections are no place for money from interest groups

    Washington Post Editorials: Latest Editorial and Editorial Archive
    Editorial Board
    20 Oct 2014 | 5:02 pm
    AMERICA’S UNUSUAL practice of electing judges has long undermined the integrity of the justice system. But the problem is getting worse: In the Citizens United age, the courtroom is becoming the next frontier in rancorous political division. Read full article >>
  • The catastrophes that a GOP-controlled Congress would bring

    Today's Opinion Columns
    Katrina vanden Heuvel
    21 Oct 2014 | 9:20 am
    With two weeks to go until the midterms, and with polls pointing to the prospect that Republicans could take control of the Senate, the stakes are high — not just for the Obama administration and congressional Democrats, but for the United States. The consequences of Republican control of both the House and Senate could be catastrophic for the environment, workers, women and minorities. Read full article >>
  • Mark Warner is a bad choice for Virginia

    Local Letters
    20 Oct 2014 | 1:16 pm
    The Oct. 16 editorial “For U.S. Senate,” a gushing endorsement of Sen. Mark Warner (D), omitted no glorifying adjectives to describe Mr. Warner’s time in the Senate, his character or his willingness to act in a bipartisan manner. However, he isn’t bipartisan; he has done little for Virginians in his first term and doesn’t deserve a second.  Read full article >>
  • Ebola and the BP oil spill

    Achenblog
    Joel Achenbach
    17 Oct 2014 | 5:59 am
    Life is busy on the Ebola beat. We start at dawn and go to midnight, and fortunately there are people to pick up the slack during the hours when we grab some sleep. The Ebola story reminds me of the BP oil spill. Remember this: Allen has at various times referred to the oil spill […]
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    The Fix

  • Wait, is the Kentucky Senate race over or not?

    Chris Cillizza
    21 Oct 2014 | 1:02 pm
    Just when you — and national Democrats, who stopped advertising in the state last week — thought the Kentucky Senate race was over, it's pulling you back in! That's because of the new Bluegrass Poll, sponsored by a conglomerate of Kentucky media outlets, that shows the race as a statistical dead heat between Sen. Mitch McConnell (R) […]
  • Democrats have an early vote problem

    Philip Bump
    21 Oct 2014 | 12:33 pm
    Two weeks ago, we looked at initial early voting data compiled by the U.S. Election Project with the aim of sussing out how campaigns were doing at putting votes in the bank. At that point, it seemed like Democrats were doing particularly well in Iowa and North Carolina compared to voter registration numbers. Republicans were […]
  • The White House’s first Web site launched 20 years ago this week. And it was amazing.

    Elahe Izadi
    21 Oct 2014 | 11:37 am
    The White House entered a weird new place called the World Wide Web when it launched its very first Web site 20 years ago this week. This was how CNN anchor Miles O'Brien described the site at the time: "For those of you brave enough to spend time sitting in front of electronic devices, there's a new place […]
  • Ranking the media from liberal to conservative, based on their audiences

    Aaron Blake
    21 Oct 2014 | 11:03 am
    One chart I didn't get to include in my post Tuesday morning on Pew's new study of Americans' media habits was the one below. Pew has basically taken the average viewer/consumer of all of these media outlets and plotted them on a continuum, trying to ascertain which outlets are favored by which side of the political […]
  • The 6 ways Oscar de la Renta brought some style to American politics

    Jaime Fuller
    21 Oct 2014 | 10:31 am
    Oscar de la Renta, famed fashion designer, died Monday at his home in Connecticut. He was 82. You can be sure that those remembering the Dominican-born designer won't be limited to the fashion industry; many of his most enduring designs were worn not by actors or models, but by politicians and their families. Here are a few […]
 
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    Washington Post Editorials: Latest Editorial and Editorial Archive

  • Judicial elections are no place for money from interest groups

    Editorial Board
    20 Oct 2014 | 5:02 pm
    AMERICA’S UNUSUAL practice of electing judges has long undermined the integrity of the justice system. But the problem is getting worse: In the Citizens United age, the courtroom is becoming the next frontier in rancorous political division. Read full article >>
  • In Milan, Germany’s leader strikes the right note on Russian sanctions

    Editorial Board
    20 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    WESTERN LEADERS boast that the sanctions slapped on Russia for its invasion of Ukraine are inflicting real pain, and that’s true — even if Russia’s macroeconomic indicators still don’t look worse than those of France, Italy or even Germany. But there’s no indication that the punishment is having a salutary effect on Vladi­mir Putin. In a quick but high-profile trip to meet leaders in Milan last week, the Russian ruler was no more disposed than he has been to retreat from Ukraine or his larger neoimperialist agenda. Read full article >>
  • Cuba should not be rewarded for denying freedom to its people

    Editorial Board
    20 Oct 2014 | 4:56 pm
    THE OTHER day, Fidel Castro wrote an opinion column for Cuba’s state-run newspaper, Granma, as he has done periodically from retirement. He lavished praise on an editorial in the New York Times that called for an end to the U.S. trade embargo on Cuba. But Mr. Castro had one complaint: The Times mentioned the harassment of dissidents and the still-unexplained death of a leading exponent of democracy, Oswaldo Payá, and a younger activist, Harold Cepero, in a car wreck two years ago. Read full article >>
  • Falling oil prices put pressure on Russia, Iran and Venezuela

    Editorial Board
    19 Oct 2014 | 3:36 pm
    THE SILVER lining in the recent financial market turbulence has been the continued decline in the price of oil, which is down about 25 percent since June. In addition to creating a windfall for U.S. consumers — one analysis reckoned the savings could amount to $600 per household — the drop, if sustained, will place considerable pressure on three problematic petrostates: Russia, Iran and Venezuela. The aggressively anti-American foreign policies pursued by all three countries in recent years have been financed in large part by soaring oil revenue. Read full article >>
  • Rethinking solitary confinement

    Editorial Board
    19 Oct 2014 | 3:35 pm
    EVERY DAY, state and federal prison authorities subject tens of thousands of inmates to solitary confinement, a psychological and physical hell resulting from near-total isolation in often tiny and windowless cells. Those who go in can come out disturbed. Those who go in with preexisting mental illnesses often get worse. The result is hypertension, panic attacks, self-mutilation and suicide, not to mention extreme difficulties reintegrating into the prison population or society at large. Damon Thibodeaux, who spent 15 years alone in a Louisiana state prison before being exonerated, explained…
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    Today's Opinion Columns

  • The catastrophes that a GOP-controlled Congress would bring

    Katrina vanden Heuvel
    21 Oct 2014 | 9:20 am
    With two weeks to go until the midterms, and with polls pointing to the prospect that Republicans could take control of the Senate, the stakes are high — not just for the Obama administration and congressional Democrats, but for the United States. The consequences of Republican control of both the House and Senate could be catastrophic for the environment, workers, women and minorities. Read full article >>
  • Cautious optimism on the economy

    Catherine Rampell
    20 Oct 2014 | 5:43 pm
    Buck up, America. For many months we had galloping stock-market growth that seemed at odds with the underlying strength of the U.S. recovery. The S&P 500 kept rising while employers remained reluctant to increase employment, builders to increase building and consumers to increase consuming. The whole situation was confusing, to say the least. Read full article >>
  • For the GOP, Senate control could be a doubled-edged sword

    Michael Gerson
    20 Oct 2014 | 5:27 pm
    On the theory that chickens should not only be counted before they hatch but also killed, let us consider the downsides for Republicans of winning both houses of Congress. This hypothetical now seems the most likely outcome, according to the various poll aggregators we now treat as oracles. The Post Election Lab, striding furthest out on the ice, puts the odds of a GOP Senate takeover at 93 percent. Read full article >>
  • Elizabeth Warren makes a powerful case

    Eugene Robinson
    20 Oct 2014 | 5:24 pm
    Sen. Elizabeth Warren says she isn’t running for president. At this rate, however, she may have to. The Massachusetts Democrat has become the brightest ideological and rhetorical light in a party whose prospects are dimmed by — to use a word Jimmy Carter never uttered — malaise. Her weekend swing through Colorado, Minnesota and Iowa to rally the faithful displayed something no other potential contender for the 2016 presidential nomination, including Hillary Clinton, seems able to present: a message. Read full article >>
  • Ebola caregivers deserve a parade

    Richard Cohen
    20 Oct 2014 | 5:23 pm
    A man my age grows up wondering: Could I have hit the beach at Normandy? How would I have handled being trapped near the Chosin Reservoir in North Korea, thousands of Chinese pouring over the border and a bitter winter coming on fast? What about Vietnam, or later Iraq and then Afghanistan and Iraq again? I come not from the Greatest Generation but the Wondering One — lucky, a reaper of what others have sown, and now, jaw agape, I wonder about health workers who leave the comforts and certainties of the United States and go to Africa to treat Ebola patients. Who are these people? Read full…
 
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    Local Letters

  • Mark Warner is a bad choice for Virginia

    20 Oct 2014 | 1:16 pm
    The Oct. 16 editorial “For U.S. Senate,” a gushing endorsement of Sen. Mark Warner (D), omitted no glorifying adjectives to describe Mr. Warner’s time in the Senate, his character or his willingness to act in a bipartisan manner. However, he isn’t bipartisan; he has done little for Virginians in his first term and doesn’t deserve a second.  Read full article >>
  • The real Titans were savvy than Disney suggested

    19 Oct 2014 | 3:33 pm
    I love hearing that my classmates, including Petey Jones, are still having a positive impact on the school [“Remember the Titan? He’s still true to his school.” front page, Oct. 14]. However, the Disney movie “Remember the Titans” left out the fact that T.C. Williams High School was integrated when it opened in 1965, as were all Alexandria schools. The movie depicted the reorganization of the Alexandria high schools in 1971 with the goal of having each school population reflect the racial balance of the city. Read full article >>
  • Don’t forget the Republican candidate for the D.C. Council

    17 Oct 2014 | 3:31 pm
    I was very displeased to see Colbert I. King omit from his Oct. 4 op-ed column the Republican candidate from the list of people running for a D.C. Council at-large seat [“Getting to know the candidates for D.C. Council”]. This glaring omission by King was the latest example of The Post’s continuing effort to ignore the D.C. Republican Party. Shameful. Read full article >>
  • A bit of lightness in Metro

    17 Oct 2014 | 3:26 pm
    There are hidden journalistic gems to be found in The Post’s Metro section. The work by reporter Martin Weil, such as the Oct. 13 article “A prickly situation: Zoo’s newest animals,” always grabs my attention and tickles my sense of humor. When the newspaper is filled with wrenching stories about the world’s woes, it is a special treat to feast my eyes on his work. Read full article >>
  • The right contributions to value

    17 Oct 2014 | 3:26 pm
    On Oct. 6, the Style section devoted most of its front page to a feature on seven government appointees who had to resign [“Joining the club”], while devoting only a few inches to a feature on the dedication of the new American Veterans Disabled for Life Memorial [“Memorial to war’s disabled is a small gem”]. Veterans whose lives have been permanently changed by disabling conditions deserve more attention than folks whose professional lives have moved on after embarrassing resignations. Read full article >>
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    Achenblog

  • Ebola and the BP oil spill

    Joel Achenbach
    17 Oct 2014 | 5:59 am
    Life is busy on the Ebola beat. We start at dawn and go to midnight, and fortunately there are people to pick up the slack during the hours when we grab some sleep. The Ebola story reminds me of the BP oil spill. Remember this: Allen has at various times referred to the oil spill […]
  • Ebola fears spread faster than the virus

    Joel Achenbach
    10 Oct 2014 | 10:45 am
    Worried about Ebola? Take a deep breath. This is a terrible crisis in West Africa, but it is exceedingly unlikely that it will become a medical crisis here in the United States. Dallas has seen one tragic case. So far there have been no confirmed additional cases (cross your fingers). Our story today on the […]
  • Paul Farmer on Ebola: “This isn’t a natural disaster, this is the terrorism of poverty”

    Joel Achenbach
    6 Oct 2014 | 5:45 am
    Africa’s Ebola problem is now America’s Ebola problem. The best way for the United States to free itself of the terror of this virus is to ensure that it is wiped out at the source, where the epidemic is currently out of control. That will happen only through a coordinated effort to provide the kind […]
  • The Charmin Dome over the White House

    Joel Achenbach
    30 Sep 2014 | 5:29 am
    Every day my colleague Carol Leonnig has another amazing story about the tissue-thin defensive perimeter around the White House, where apparently you can jump the fence, run across the lawn, barrel through the unlocked front door and scamper around with wild abandon — doing what tourists have always dreamed of doing, like checking out the […]
  • Cosmic smash-up: BICEP2′s big bang discovery getting dusted by new satellite data

    Joel Achenbach
    22 Sep 2014 | 5:44 am
    [This item has been revised and updated.] In March, scientists representing an experiment called BICEP2 announced at a news conference at Harvard that they had detected gravitational waves from a violent inflationary event at the dawn of time. The scientists had built a telescope at the South Pole and stared into the polar sky to discern […]
 
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    Anne Applebaum: Most Recent Articles and Archives

  • The West is paying dearly for cozying up to Russia over 25 years

    Anne Applebaum
    17 Oct 2014 | 12:30 pm
    Looking back over the past quarter-century, it isn’t easy to name a Western policy that can truly be described as a success. The impact of Western development aid is debatable. Western interventions in the Middle East have been disastrous. Read full article >>
  • China’s explanation for the Hong Kong protests? Blame America.

    Anne Applebaum
    3 Oct 2014 | 4:18 pm
    More than 50,000 people have filled the streets of Hong Kong in the past few days, and at times the number has climbed higher. The photographs of these gatherings have shown a remarkably calm, remarkably disciplined crowd. Students do their homework on the sidewalk. Others stack up plastic bottles for recycling and sweep the streets. Read full article >>
  • Scotland sends Europe’s elites a warning

    Anne Applebaum
    19 Sep 2014 | 8:44 am
    LONDON In Aberdeenshire, more than 87 percent of people voted on Scotland’s independence referendum; in Clackmannanshire, the number was above 88 percent; in the Western Isles, it was close to 90 percent. One remote Highland peninsula actually achieved a 100 percent turnout — meaning that all 98 residents showed up to vote. Read full article >>
  • War in Europe is not a hysterical idea

    Anne Applebaum
    29 Aug 2014 | 9:20 am
    WARSAW Over and over again — throughout the entirety of my adult life, or so it feels — I have been shown Polish photographs from the beautiful summer of 1939: The children playing in the sunshine, the fashionable women on Krakow streets. I have even seen a picture of a family wedding that took place in June 1939, in the garden of a Polish country house I now own. All of these pictures convey a sense of doom, for we know what happened next. September 1939 brought invasion from both east and west, occupation, chaos, destruction, genocide. Most of the people who attended that June wedding…
  • Obama’s legacy could be a revitalized NATO

    Anne Applebaum
    22 Aug 2014 | 5:02 pm
    Not long ago, someone asked me about President Obama’s foreign policy “legacy.” I was startled by the question. There are two whole years left, I told my interlocutor; it’s way too early. She seemed surprised that I was surprised: “Can he really do anything significant in only two years?” Read full article >>
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    Richard Cohen: Most Recent Articles and Archives

  • Ebola caregivers deserve a parade

    Richard Cohen
    20 Oct 2014 | 5:23 pm
    A man my age grows up wondering: Could I have hit the beach at Normandy? How would I have handled being trapped near the Chosin Reservoir in North Korea, thousands of Chinese pouring over the border and a bitter winter coming on fast? What about Vietnam, or later Iraq and then Afghanistan and Iraq again? I come not from the Greatest Generation but the Wondering One — lucky, a reaper of what others have sown, and now, jaw agape, I wonder about health workers who leave the comforts and certainties of the United States and go to Africa to treat Ebola patients. Who are these people? Read full…
  • Internationally, Obama must be feared as well as admired

    Richard Cohen
    13 Oct 2014 | 5:21 pm
    Tell me something: What do you think would happen if the United States concludes that Iran has been cheating and delaying and is about to pop a fully functional nuclear weapons program? Would President Obama respond by joining Israel to bomb the Iranian nuclear facilities to smithereens, or would he stall and equivocate? My bet is the latter and also, just to double down, what I bet the Iranians are betting. They have taken the measure of Obama. He lacks menace. Read full article >>
  • Richard Cohen: The actual value of a college education

    Richard Cohen
    6 Oct 2014 | 5:15 pm
    I never went to college to make money. (A totally successful business plan, by the way.) Instead, I went for an education. (Another totally successful business plan.) To fulfill a requirement, I took anthropology, and I have kept up with it ever since. I reveled in political science and history of all kinds, and I felt for a long time that I had discovered all the secrets of life in psychology, although its Freudian variety left me cold. The id never made much sense to me. Read full article >>
  • Bill O’Reilly’s lame excuse for his awful ‘Killing Patton’ blunder

    Richard Cohen
    6 Oct 2014 | 7:46 am
    As I just knew he would, Bill O’Reilly has explained why he failed to mention that Gen. George S. Patton, the unmistakable (though somewhat flawed) hero of his latest book, was a rabid anti-Semite who mistreated the Holocaust survivors in his care: The “narrative was tight,” he explained on his Fox News show last Wednesday. To be as charitable about this as possible, I now have to wonder if O’Reilly read his own book. Read full article >>
  • What Bill O’Reilly ignored about George Patton

    Richard Cohen
    29 Sep 2014 | 6:10 pm
    It’s a fortunate thing that Bill O’Reilly’s latest book, “Killing Patton,” was written by him and not someone else. If not, O’Reilly would have taken the poor person apart, criticizing the book for its chaotic structure, its considerable padding and its repellent admiration of a war-loving martinet who fought the Nazis and really never understood why. George S. Patton stood almost shoulder to shoulder with them in his anti-Semitism — not that O’Reilly seems to have noticed or, for that matter, mentioned it in his book. Read full article >>
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    E.J. Dionne Columns and Blog Posts

  • Both parties face a blue-collar imperative

    E.J. Dionne Jr.
    19 Oct 2014 | 3:29 pm
    In Georgia, Democrat Michelle Nunn is giving Republicans a real scare in a Senate race the GOP thought it had put away. Some of her new momentum comes from a sustained attack on David Perdue, her businessman foe, for his work shipping American jobs overseas. Read full article >>
  • When our government was good

    E.J. Dionne Jr.
    15 Oct 2014 | 5:04 pm
    THORNDALE, Pa. Tom Wolf’s mood is sunny but his words are serious. He’s answering teachers’ questions at an elementary school featured last year in a New York Times story about the costs of overcrowding and underinvestment. The Democratic nominee for Pennsylvania governor, Wolf criticizes incumbent Tom Corbett (R) for education cuts, but he is not terribly partisan about it. Wolf is a businessman who also holds a PhD in political science, and he offers a brief commentary on the importance of “public goods,” not a term typically invoked on the stump. Read full article >>
  • ‘Citizens United’ is turning more Americans into bystanders

    E.J. Dionne Jr.
    12 Oct 2014 | 3:46 pm
    Are we spending our democracy into oblivion? This is the time of year when media scribblers bemoan how nasty political campaigns have become. The complainers are accused of a dainty form of historical ignorance by defenders of mud-slinging who drag out Finley Peter Dunne’s 1895 assertion that “politics ain’t beanbag.” Politics has always been nasty, the argument goes, so we should get over it. Read full article >>
  • EJ Dionne: A North Carolina rebellion against the ultra-conservatives?

    E.J. Dionne Jr.
    8 Oct 2014 | 4:36 pm
    BURLINGTON, N.C. The clergy gathered in the ­second-floor conference room at the First Baptist Church here were pondering whether this midterm election might be different from other midterm elections. The five African American pastors and bishops represented diverse theological traditions, but all were profoundly unhappy over what North Carolina’s ultra-conservative state government in Raleigh had done to reduce access to the ballot box, cut education spending and turn back money to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. Read full article >>
  • Why Democrats aren’t getting credit for the economy

    E.J. Dionne Jr.
    5 Oct 2014 | 4:57 pm
    As Ken Burns’s superb documentary on the Roosevelts reminded us, “Happy Days Are Here Again” is one of the most evocative anthems in the history of the Democratic Party. You have to ask: Why aren’t the Democrats, and the country, singing it loudly now? Read full article >>
 
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    Michael Gerson: Most Recent Articles and Archives

  • For the GOP, Senate control could be a doubled-edged sword

    Michael Gerson
    20 Oct 2014 | 5:27 pm
    On the theory that chickens should not only be counted before they hatch but also killed, let us consider the downsides for Republicans of winning both houses of Congress. This hypothetical now seems the most likely outcome, according to the various poll aggregators we now treat as oracles. The Post Election Lab, striding furthest out on the ice, puts the odds of a GOP Senate takeover at 93 percent. Read full article >>
  • Ebola challenges America’s ability to adapt

    Michael Gerson
    16 Oct 2014 | 5:42 pm
    In any health care setting, it is wise to listen to the nurses, who see all. Their reports from Dallas about the initial procedures used in treating Thomas Eric Duncan are appalling. Safety suits with exposed necklines left nurses to cover skin with tape. When tape is removed, it abrades the skin. One health expert I consulted described this practice in dealing with Ebola as “moronic.” Read full article >>
  • U.S. isolation is bad policy, even if Americans say they want it

    Michael Gerson
    13 Oct 2014 | 5:20 pm
    The value of U.S. foreign policy conducted by majority vote — which might have resulted in a Nazi-occupied London — is once again evident. In 2013, 52 percent of Americans agreed that their country should “mind its own business internationally.” (In 1964, the figure was 20 percent.) This robust consensus for disengagement was soon followed by the rapid expansion of the Islamic State in a vacuum left by U.S. inattention, and then by an outbreak of Ebola in West Africa that should have been confronted months earlier with larger resources. Read full article >>
  • A question of leadership

    Michael Gerson
    9 Oct 2014 | 5:05 pm
    Disloyal or not, former defense secretary Leon Panetta has delivered a root-and-branch critique of President Obama’s approach to the Middle East. In his new book, “Worthy Fights,” and in surrounding interviews, Panetta contends that the White House was “eager to rid itself of Iraq”; that in 2011 an agreement to preserve American influence in that country was allowed to “slip away”; that this outcome endangered Iraq’s “fragile stability”; and that he warned the White House this might result in “a new haven for terrorists to plot attacks against the U.S.” Panetta argues…
  • Ethical choices surround a potential Ebola vaccine

    Michael Gerson
    6 Oct 2014 | 5:17 pm
    Here is what officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health have been telling us: America has some Ebola infections (and is likely to see more), but America does not have an Ebola outbreak, which is extremely unlikely in a health system capable of basic public health measures (such as isolation and contact-tracing). Read full article >>
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    David Ignatius: Most Recent Articles and Archives

  • Remembering freewheeling energy titan Christophe de Margerie

    David Ignatius
    21 Oct 2014 | 8:05 am
    BEIRUT — Christophe de Margerie was the kind of outsize character you wouldn’t expect to survive in in a homogenized global business environment. He loved single-malt whiskey, he cursed like a French sailor on shore leave, he stayed out way too late partying and he got in trouble with the law at home in France and abroad. Read full article >>
  • Nothing to fear but panic itself

    David Ignatius
    16 Oct 2014 | 5:21 pm
    Richard Preston, whose 1994 book “The Hot Zone” brought the Ebola virus terrifyingly to life for readers, once described how, during his research, his biohazard suit had ripped open, exposing him to a potentially fatal toxin. Read full article >>
  • Syrian opposition falls deeper into disarray

    David Ignatius
    15 Oct 2014 | 5:13 pm
    The political disarray of the Syrian opposition — and the regional feuding that drives it — deepened in Istanbul this week, as Qatar pushed its preferred Islamist candidate into a key leadership position of the major rebel coalition despite bitter protest from rival factions backed by Saudi Arabia and other nations. Read full article >>
  • Obama faces growing pressure to escalate in Iraq and Syria

    David Ignatius
    14 Oct 2014 | 4:28 pm
    As fighters from the Islamic State surge in Iraq toward control of Anbar province in the west and the town of Kobane on the Syrian border , U.S. commanders and diplomats are signaling that the United States must expand its military operations before the extremists control even more territory. Read full article >>
  • The problem with America’s limited wars

    David Ignatius
    9 Oct 2014 | 5:24 pm
    What happens when an American plan for limited war against the Islamic State meets the savage reality of combat, as happened this week when the extremists pounded Kurdish fighters just inside Syria’s border with Turkey ? The cry rose in Washington and abroad for more American military involvement. This is how conflicts that start off contained begin to escalate. Read full article >>
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    Ruth Marcus: Most Recent Articles and Archives

  • A campaign with no answers

    Ruth Marcus
    17 Oct 2014 | 5:10 pm
    The closing days of a closely fought election rarely offer uplifting moments, but the 2014 season has been particularly dreary, nearly devoid of content and high on unedifying spectacle. Perhaps the iconic moment came when former Florida governor Charlie Crist (D) faced an empty lectern for seven minutes while his Republican opponent, Gov. Rick Scott, sulked over Crist’s insistence that he have a cooling fan at his stand. Seriously, seven minutes. At which point Scott blinked, and the debate that voters deserved could finally start. Read full article >>
  • Ruth Marcus: Actually, flu is the virus you should really be worrying about

    Ruth Marcus
    14 Oct 2014 | 4:36 pm
    If you are worried about contracting Ebola, I have two suggestions. First, stop. Second, get a flu shot. On the first: If you live in the United States, your chances of getting Ebola are vanishingly small — even if you are a health-care worker, or a journalist who travels to Africa to report on the epidemic. Read full article >>
  • Hillary Clinton’s increasing comfort with being a female almost-candidate

    Ruth Marcus
    10 Oct 2014 | 4:19 pm
    The 2008 campaign was the first with a woman as a serious presidential contender, so it was not surprising that gender was an uncomfortable, tiptoe-y subject. The male candidates weren’t sure-footed in dealing with it — recall Barack Obama’s “you’re likable enough, Hillary” and the debate discussion about the color of her jacket. Read full article >>
  • America’s amazing transformation on same-sex marriage

    Ruth Marcus
    7 Oct 2014 | 12:19 pm
    Who would have thought: ●That gay rights groups’ biggest concern would be not how the Supreme Court would rule on same-sex marriage but that it wasn’t ruling fast enough? ●That the Republican response to the justices’ move to let same-sex marriages proceed in nearly half the states would be near-total silence? Read full article >>
  • In Texas, an undue burden on women seeking abortions

    Ruth Marcus
    3 Oct 2014 | 4:03 pm
    I was in the jittery Supreme Court chamber on a summer morning in 1992 when the right to abortion was on the line. As the justices took their seats, no one except court insiders knew whether the session would end with five votes to overrule Roe v. Wade, or with something more restrained. Read full article >>
 
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    Harold Meyerson: Most Recent Articles and Archives

  • Economically, Germany is a threat to itself

    Harold Meyerson
    15 Oct 2014 | 5:21 pm
    I am a fan, as a number of my columns attest, of Germany’s worker empowerment. By requiring corporations to divide their boards evenly between worker and management representatives and mandating that employers meet regularly with their employees to discuss and resolve company concerns, Germany has retained a high-end manufacturing sector that has enabled the nation to prosper while every other advanced economy has suffered hard times. Through a government program that provided firms with the funds to keep workers employed part time but at near full-time pay during the 2008-2009 economic…
  • Harold Meyerson: How workers lost the power struggle — and their pay raises

    Harold Meyerson
    8 Oct 2014 | 4:10 pm
    The extinction of the American raise — dead as a dodo, by every empirical measure — has become a truth universally acknowledged. Even Republican House Speaker John Boehner, not a fellow often glimpsed on the barricades with protesting workers, pronounced that “wages are stagnant” in his comments on the most recent employment figures. Read full article >>
  • The trade clause that overrules governments

    Harold Meyerson
    1 Oct 2014 | 4:37 pm
    One of the public policy paradoxes of the past quarter-century is why the center-left governments of advanced economies have supported trade policies that undermine the very environmental and labor protections they fight for at home. Foremost among these self-subverting policies have been the Investor-State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) provisions included in every significant trade deal the United States has signed since Ronald Reagan’s presidency. Under ISDS, foreign investors can sue a nation with which their own country has such treaty arrangements over any rules, regulations or changes in…
  • Germany’s major export: economic optimism

    Harold Meyerson
    24 Sep 2014 | 4:49 pm
    If you live in an advanced economy — in Western Europe, Japan or the United States — odds are you’re in a funk. Unless you live in Germany. This month, the Pew Research Center released the results of polling it conducted in 44 nations — 10 of them with what Pew characterized as “advanced” economies (including the United States, France, Japan, Germany, Italy and the United Kingdom). The two key questions posed were whether respondents were “satisfied or dissatisfied” with the way things were going in their country and whether they thought the “economic situation in [their]…
  • Workers deserve to benefit from their productivity, too

    Harold Meyerson
    18 Sep 2014 | 5:10 am
    The fight to increase Americans’ stagnant incomes is, at long last, growing more serious. Thursday, with the explicit backing of the House Democratic Caucus, Maryland Rep. Chris Van Hollen, the ranking Democrat on the Budget Committee, is introducing a bill that would prompt corporations to reward workers — not just top executives and major shareholders — for their gains in productivity. Read full article >>
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    Eugene Robinson Columns and Blog Posts

  • Elizabeth Warren makes a powerful case

    Eugene Robinson
    20 Oct 2014 | 5:24 pm
    Sen. Elizabeth Warren says she isn’t running for president. At this rate, however, she may have to. The Massachusetts Democrat has become the brightest ideological and rhetorical light in a party whose prospects are dimmed by — to use a word Jimmy Carter never uttered — malaise. Her weekend swing through Colorado, Minnesota and Iowa to rally the faithful displayed something no other potential contender for the 2016 presidential nomination, including Hillary Clinton, seems able to present: a message. Read full article >>
  • On Ebola, we need a dose of candor

    Eugene Robinson
    16 Oct 2014 | 5:22 pm
    Let’s make a deal: We’ll all promise not to panic about Ebola if the experts — especially those at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — agree to get their stories straight. They should begin by giving a better explanation of why they have concluded it would be wrong to “stop the flights” arriving from the Ebola “hot zone,” beginning with the fact that there are no such flights: There is no direct commercial air service between the countries at the epicenter of the outbreak — Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea — and the United States. Read full article >>
  • Our failing war against the Islamic State

    Eugene Robinson
    13 Oct 2014 | 5:19 pm
    It’s not too soon to state the obvious: At this point, the war against the Islamic State can be seen only as failing. U.S.-led air power has barely been able to keep the jihadist militants from capturing the Syrian town of Kobane, near the Turkish border — and the besieged city may yet fall. Far to the southeast, Islamic State fighters have come within a few miles of Baghdad and threaten to consolidate their control of the vast Anbar Province, the Sunni heartland of Iraq. The self-proclaimed “caliphate” remains intact, and its forces are advancing. Read full article >>
  • America’s stake in the Ebola fight

    Eugene Robinson
    9 Oct 2014 | 5:02 pm
    Ebola is a nightmare disease that travel restrictions cannot keep out. The correct response should be urgent concern — not panic — and an all-out crusade to extinguish the West Africa outbreak of the deadly virus at its source. Read full article >>
  • We’ve reached the inevitable tipping point on gay marriage

    Eugene Robinson
    6 Oct 2014 | 5:16 pm
    By deciding not to decide, the Supreme Court may have decided: If history is a guide, same-sex marriage will soon be the law of the land. The court’s refusal to take up cases brought by five states seeking to overturn appellate court rulings in favor of gay marriage — Indiana, Oklahoma, Utah, Virginia and Wisconsin — was a surprise. It does not mean that Chief Justice John Roberts and the conservative majority have gone all “Kumbaya.” But it can be seen as a surrender to the inevitable. Read full article >>
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    Robert Samuelson: Most Recent Articles and Archives

  • Stock market turmoil and the global debt trap

    Robert J. Samuelson
    16 Oct 2014 | 5:38 pm
    Six years after the onset of the financial crisis, the world still has too much debt. The total in 2013, according to the McKinsey Global Institute, came to about $186 trillion. This includes government debt, corporate bonds and loans to individuals, families and businesses. Since 2008, the amount has actually increased by about $34 trillion. The numbers are so large that it’s hard for ordinary mortals to connect them with the world economy’s ability to grow at a decent and self-sustained pace. Doubts about this underlie the stock market’s recent turmoil. Read full article >>
  • Women join the top 1 percent

    Robert J. Samuelson
    15 Oct 2014 | 8:35 am
    Everyone knows that economic inequality has increased dramatically since the 1970s, and this has created a new cottage industry: dissecting “the top 1 percent.” We now have a study from three economists that broadens what we know about these top earners. The study’s biggest news: Economic inequality is becoming more gender-neutral. Read full article >>
  • Why the world economy sputters

    Robert J. Samuelson
    12 Oct 2014 | 3:45 pm
    It’s become a dreary ritual: Every six months, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) forecasts the global economy — and cuts its previous forecast. Despite an army of economists, all of its forecasts since 2011 have been too optimistic. The latest, released last week, shaved 0.4 percentage points off the growth estimate made in April. The world economy is now expected to expand only 3.3 percent in 2014, down from a respectable 5.4 percent in 2010. The feeble growth raises the specter of a global recession. Read full article >>
  • Humanity is actually making progress, believe it or not

    Robert J. Samuelson
    8 Oct 2014 | 9:15 am
    Progress has lately gotten a bad rap, because there seems to be so little of it. Violence wracks the Middle East; economies are sputtering; Ebola strikes fear. But if you step back a bit, there is plenty of progress. We ought to remind ourselves periodically that, in history’s broad sweep, the long-term advances often overshadow the short-term defeats. Read full article >>
  • The new era of muddle-nomics

    Robert J. Samuelson
    5 Oct 2014 | 4:55 pm
    I have been reading Martin Wolf’s “The Shifts and the Shocks,” a detailed analysis of the 2008-2009 financial crisis and its aftermath. Wolf is the chief economic columnist of the Financial Times, an English paper with a global audience. He and New York Times columnist Paul Krugman are probably the world’s most influential economic commentators. What Wolf says matters because he is hugely well-informed and respected. Read full article >>
 
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    George F. Will: Most Recent Articles and Archives

  • In Colorado, overheated rhetoric from ‘Mark Uterus’

    George F. Will
    17 Oct 2014 | 4:34 pm
    DENVER One of the wonders of this political moment is feminist contentment about the infantilization of women in the name of progressive politics. Government, encouraging academic administrations to micromanage campus sexual interactions, now assumes that, absent a script, women cannot cope. And the Democrats’ trope about the Republicans’ “war on women” clearly assumes that women are civic illiterates. Read full article >>
  • Will the FCC try to tackle ‘Redskins’?

    George F. Will
    15 Oct 2014 | 5:05 pm
    Wretched excess by government can be beneficial if it startles people into wholesome disgust and deepened distrust and it prompts judicial rebukes that enlarge freedom. So let’s hope the Federal Communications Commission embraces the formal petition inciting it to deny licenses to broadcasters who use the word “Redskins” when reporting on the Washington Redskins. Read full article >>
  • Supreme Court has a chance to bring liberty to teeth whitening

    George F. Will
    10 Oct 2014 | 4:03 pm
    Come Tuesday, the national pastime will be the subject of oral arguments in a portentous Supreme Court case. This pastime is not baseball but rent-seeking — the unseemly yet uninhibited scramble of private interests to bend government power for their benefit. If the court directs a judicial scowl at North Carolina’s State Board of Dental Examiners, the court will thereby advance a basic liberty — the right of Americans to earn a living without unreasonable government interference. Read full article >>
  • George Will: Chris Christie lays the groundwork for a 2016 presidential run

    George F. Will
    8 Oct 2014 | 4:29 pm
    NEWARK New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie could be forgiven if he had chips on both shoulders as big as those shoulders. This year, the first of his second term, has been overshadowed by often partisan investigations, more protracted than productive, of the involvement of several of his former aides — he fired them — in the closing of some access lanes to the George Washington Bridge. Read full article >>
  • A Bell-ringer in New Jersey

    George F. Will
    3 Oct 2014 | 4:10 pm
    PRINCETON, N.J. Every 36 years, it seems, Jeff Bell disturbs New Jersey’s political order. In 1978, as a 34-year-old apostle of supply-side economics and a harbinger of the Reagan Revolution, he stunned the keepers of the conventional wisdom by defeating a four-term senator, Clifford Case, in the Republican primary. Bell, a Columbia University graduate who fought in Vietnam, lost to Bill Bradley in the 1978 general election, but in 1982 he went to Washington to help implement President Reagan’s economic policies that produced five quarters of above 7 percent growth and six years averaging…
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    Going Out Guide

  • Let’s play New York Times D.C. Dining bingo!

    Maura Judkis and Fritz Hahn
    21 Oct 2014 | 10:15 am
    Look! The New York Times has plugged new keywords into its book of D.C. Dining Mad Libs for its latest assessment of how we're eating. Let's see what they came up with this time, in a piece that proclaims "the future of dining in Washington, D.C. has arrived." For decades, Washington’s dining scene has been made […]
  • Frank Ruta’s family-style Bread Feasts start Thursday

    Tim Carman
    20 Oct 2014 | 1:16 pm
    Bread Feast, a series of weekly dinners prepared by Palena's former culinary team of Frank Ruta and Aggie Chin, will debut on Thursday at Bread Furst, more than a month later than originally planned. Tickets for the first four-course meal are now on sale online for $85 per person, with more dinner dates expected to […]
  • Crinkle-cuts are back at Shake Shack. Cue the tears of joy.

    Lavanya Ramanathan
    20 Oct 2014 | 1:00 pm
    Shake Shack's hand-cut, skin-on french fry debacle is finally over. The crinkle-cut has been restored to the menus of every Washington-area Shack. Go on, cry a little. Do your happy dance. You're going to need the exercise. The burger chain's decision to roll out a new french fry this spring -- replacing its old-school, frozen […]
  • Will Artley leaves Pizzeria Orso

    Maura Judkis
    20 Oct 2014 | 10:49 am
    Chef Will Artley will leave Falls Church's Pizzeria Orso to focus on personal projects, the restaurant announced today. Artley, who received media attention for losing 75 pounds in a culinary weight loss challenge, became a triathlete and will devote his time to "on personal ventures related to his impressive milestones in the health and fitness […]
  • $10 or Less: Improv comedy, ‘Women in Comedy’ and Harvest Festival

    Macy Freeman
    19 Oct 2014 | 6:00 am
    The Going Out Guide recommends free or low-cost things to do this week. (Events are free unless otherwise noted.) MONDAY Smart Growth: Cities Versus Natural Disasters: Retreat or Resist? Held in conjunction with the National Building Museum exhibition “Designing for Disaster,” this discussion, featuring NPR's Cities Project editor Franklyn Cater, focuses on the impact of […]
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    Carolyn Hax: Latest Carolyn Hax Articles, Carolyn Hax Archive

  • Carolyn Hax: Reassuring the girlfriend with the occasional ‘ugh, I’m so fat’ issues

    Carolyn Hax
    20 Oct 2014 | 8:59 pm
    Adapted from a recent online discussion. Dear Carolyn: The woman I love has some real issues with her appearance that I don’t understand. The “ugh, I’m so fat” thing is just the surface. I tend to reflexively assure her, but she says that doesn’t help at all. Then if I ignore the woe-is-me stuff, she just seems to wallow until I assure her, then it stops for a while. Read full article >>
  • Carolyn Hax: After a long career path, now for something completely different

    Carolyn Hax
    19 Oct 2014 | 8:59 pm
    Adapted from a recent online discussion. Hi, Carolyn: I’ve spent most of my life working toward a certain career. Now, in my senior year of college, with acceptance to my grad school of choice and employment for when I graduate, I’m thinking about going a very different route. Read full article >>
  • Carolyn Hax: Truth about father probably won’t set them free

    Carolyn Hax
    18 Oct 2014 | 8:59 pm
    Dear Carolyn: My father had several affairs, left our family and remarried another woman. We have confronted him about his sins, but he acts as though everything is fine and he has done nothing wrong. I also have a maternal aunt who has a son, but we don’t know his father. Our family believes our father is also his father because our cousin looks like my father when he was young. My father calls him often and even attended his graduation. Read full article >>
  • Carolyn Hax: Mistrust arises over husband’s secret friend

    Carolyn Hax
    17 Oct 2014 | 8:59 pm
    Adapted from a recent online discussion. Dear Carolyn: I hate writing a question that makes me sound like a jealous wife, but here goes. The first time I heard of my husband’s good friend “Daphne” was when he added her to the wedding invitation list. He said she was his best friend, which seemed very weird to me since I had never heard of her in two-plus years of dating. Read full article >>
  • Hax Philes: Make the pregnancy comments stop

    Carolyn Hax
    17 Oct 2014 | 1:55 pm
    From the Oct. 17 chat: “I just told co-workers that I’m pregnant. I’m having trouble with co-workers who comment on my food choices and footwear (!). “Those heels are too high.” “You shouldn’t drink that!” “Have you eaten a fruit today?” “Now those shoes are a good choice!” This happened at another job with my first pregnancy. I know different comments are appropriate in different cultures, but I find it really annoying, especially at work. For some background knowledge, I’m 33, have a healthy toddler, am fairly well-educated and am following all the normal prenatal…
 
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