Washington Post

  • Most Topular Stories

  • For most of history, politicians haven’t been able to have Halloween Twitter names. This is a travesty.

    The Fix
    Jaime Fuller and Philip Bump
    31 Oct 2014 | 1:54 pm
    Yes, Rep. John Dingell, you are doing it right. Every Halloween, Twitter users celebrate by making puns. This would seem unremarkable at all other points of the year, since 46 percent of Twitter users have been found to use the social media platform primarily for making bad puns about current events that can no longer be accurately […]
  • North Korea’s leaders must be held to account for human rights abuses

    Washington Post Editorials: Latest Editorial and Editorial Archive
    Editorial Board
    30 Oct 2014 | 4:54 pm
    THE UNITED Nations, so often inclined toward rhetoric instead of action, seems to be drawing closer to action to deal with the human rights disaster in North Korea. The latest welcome step was a report to a General Assembly committee Oct. 28 from Marzuki Darusman, the special rapporteur on human rights in North Korea. Mr. Darusman, an Indonesian jurist, called on the United Nations to ask the International Criminal Court to take up the matter on grounds that crimes against humanity have been committed. We agree. Read full article >>
  • Can Rand Paul save the Republican Party?

    Today's Opinion Columns
    Dana Milbank
    31 Oct 2014 | 8:05 am
    “The Republican Party brand sucks,” Republican Rand Paul said in Detroit this week. This was candid, and correct: Though the GOP will make gains in Tuesday’s midterm elections, its long-term prospects are grim because young people, women and minorities don’t feel welcome in the party. Read full article >>
  • The mirror image of South Carolina’s politics

    Local Letters
    29 Oct 2014 | 2:46 pm
    The Oct. 26 front-page article “ ‘Why would anyone run?’ ” focused on the politics of South Carolina. Maybe it hit too close to home to insert Maryland in place of South Carolina and Democrats in place of Republicans. Read full article >>
  • World Series still not over, scientists discover

    Achenblog
    Joel Achenbach
    27 Oct 2014 | 5:22 am
    Yesterday I went for a great hike on the Appalachian Trail, ascending the spine of South Mountain to reach a rocky promontory. Behold the ancient crumpled landscape, the hardwoods rapidly skewing toward the gold and the red, and the river below sparkling as it sliced through the ridges to reach the Piedmont. What I enjoyed […]
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Fix

  • For most of history, politicians haven’t been able to have Halloween Twitter names. This is a travesty.

    Jaime Fuller and Philip Bump
    31 Oct 2014 | 1:54 pm
    Yes, Rep. John Dingell, you are doing it right. Every Halloween, Twitter users celebrate by making puns. This would seem unremarkable at all other points of the year, since 46 percent of Twitter users have been found to use the social media platform primarily for making bad puns about current events that can no longer be accurately […]
  • Ranking the presidents on how completely terrible their midterm elections turned out

    Philip Bump
    31 Oct 2014 | 10:50 am
    President Obama, political guru Stuart Rothenberg writes, is "likely to have the worst midterm numbers of any two-term president going back to Democrat Harry S. Truman." Usually presidents have one terrible midterm and a mediocre one; 2014, Rothenberg thinks, could vault Obama into the top tier of midterm losers. Or, it could not. We don't […]
  • Which campaigns are the worst robocall offenders?

    Jaime Fuller
    31 Oct 2014 | 10:30 am
    It's fitting that the midterms occur only days after Halloween, seeing as campaigns deploy terrifying-sounding tactics to drive you insane (and/or to vote). They slip literature under your door after knocking forever. They blanket your TV in ominous ads. They call your house non-stop. There are ways to avoid all of this, though -- if […]
  • Here are the top 4 Google searches for a bunch of candidates — and what they tell us

    Aaron Blake
    31 Oct 2014 | 9:56 am
    You can learn a lot about the state of American politics by looking at what people Google. And in case you had any questions about why political campaigns spend so much time tearing down their opponents, I bring to you: The top four Google searches for candidates in eight major Senate races (over the past 30 […]
  • Do those ‘we know whether you voted’ warnings actually work? An expert weighs in.

    Philip Bump
    31 Oct 2014 | 8:26 am
    The favorite distinction of the political hack is between the privacy of your vote and privacy that you vote. Modern politics is heavily dependent on knowing how often you make it to the polls, driving polling, ad targeting, and -- in increasingly direct ways -- efforts to get you to the polls. Earlier this week, […]
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Washington Post Editorials: Latest Editorial and Editorial Archive

  • North Korea’s leaders must be held to account for human rights abuses

    Editorial Board
    30 Oct 2014 | 4:54 pm
    THE UNITED Nations, so often inclined toward rhetoric instead of action, seems to be drawing closer to action to deal with the human rights disaster in North Korea. The latest welcome step was a report to a General Assembly committee Oct. 28 from Marzuki Darusman, the special rapporteur on human rights in North Korea. Mr. Darusman, an Indonesian jurist, called on the United Nations to ask the International Criminal Court to take up the matter on grounds that crimes against humanity have been committed. We agree. Read full article >>
  • Fairfax County high school students will benefit from later start times

    Editorial Board
    30 Oct 2014 | 4:45 pm
    FAIRFAX SCHOOL officials have characterized as a no-brainer their decision to start the high school day a bit later each morning. “So clear and compelling” are the health benefits of adequate sleep for adolescents, said school board chairman Tammy ­Derenak-Kaufax, “we felt that we had to make a change.” Read full article >>
  • For Arlington County Board and school board

    Editorial Board
    30 Oct 2014 | 4:43 pm
    BY ALMOST any measure, Arlington County is a local and national success story, having remade itself over two decades — with a big assist from Metro — from a green but sleepy suburb into a still green but diverse, dynamic and highly desirable set of communities. Lately, the political comity that helped guide that transformation has frayed amid a bitter debate over a proposal to build an expensive streetcar line on fixed tracks along Columbia Pike. Read full article >>
  • Can voters look forward to a Congress that actually governs?

    Editorial Board
    29 Oct 2014 | 4:30 pm
    AS NEXT week’s midterm elections approach, Americans are in a dark mood. The latest Washington Post-ABC News poll, released Tuesday, reports that 68 percent of likely voters think that the country is “on the wrong track”; a CNN-ORC International poll that came out the same day says 68 percent are angry “about the way things are going in the country today.” Read full article >>
  • The access children have to guns is alarming

    Editorial Board
    29 Oct 2014 | 4:27 pm
    DAYS BEFORE 15-year-old Jaylen Fryberg strode into his high school cafeteria and fired a gun at friends and finally himself, he wrote a tweet that hinted at some kind of problem: “It breaks me it actually does. I know it seems like I’m sweating it off. But I’m not.” The words are now being plumbed by authorities for clues to help explain last week’s murderous rampage at Marysville-Pilchuck High School in Washington state. Read full article >>
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Today's Opinion Columns

  • Can Rand Paul save the Republican Party?

    Dana Milbank
    31 Oct 2014 | 8:05 am
    “The Republican Party brand sucks,” Republican Rand Paul said in Detroit this week. This was candid, and correct: Though the GOP will make gains in Tuesday’s midterm elections, its long-term prospects are grim because young people, women and minorities don’t feel welcome in the party. Read full article >>
  • David Ignatius: An Iranian who could balance Tehran’s factions?

    David Ignatius
    30 Oct 2014 | 5:28 pm
    An intriguing figure is gaining prominence in the Iranian government just as regional conflicts in Iraq and Syria intensify and nuclear talks with the West move toward a Nov. 24 deadline. The newly prominent official is Ali Shamkhani, the head of Iran’s national security council. He played a key role last summer in the ouster of Nouri al-Maliki as Iraq’s prime minister. In interviews over the past few weeks, Iraqi, Iranian, Lebanese, European and U.S. officials have all described Shamkhani as a rising political player. Read full article >>
  • A global attention on disease gives Bill Gates his moment

    Michael Gerson
    30 Oct 2014 | 5:24 pm
    “Ebola has reminded people that it is not just poor people who can die of infectious disease,” Bill Gates tells me, in a characteristically matter-of-fact tone. In a tragic, unsought sense, this is Gates’s moment. The focus of his life — preventable disease — is suddenly the obsession of the world. Gates, who has donated $50 million to the Ebola fight (through his foundation), will give a major address Sunday at the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. According to a preview copy of the speech, he will cover the waterfront of vicious infections, from sleeping sickness…
  • Catherine Rampell: Millennial voters feel abandoned by Democrats

    Catherine Rampell
    30 Oct 2014 | 5:11 pm
    What is this, Stockholm Syndrome? The latest polling data from Harvard’s Institute of Politics should be discouraging to Democrats, who have traditionally been able to depend on young bleeding-hearts for electoral support: A majority of 18- to 29-year-old likely voters now say they would prefer a Republican-controlled Congress to a Democratic one, by a margin of 4 percentage points. That’s true even though those very same voters say Democrats in Congress are doing a better job than their Republican counterparts. Read full article >>
  • Election Day looking like a referendum on competence

    Charles Krauthammer
    30 Oct 2014 | 4:29 pm
    Is this election really about nothing? Democrats might like to think so, but it’s not. First, like all U.S. elections, it’s about the economy. The effect of the weakest recovery in two generations is reflected in President Obama’s 13-point underwater ratings for his handling of the economy. Read full article >>
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Local Letters

  • The mirror image of South Carolina’s politics

    29 Oct 2014 | 2:46 pm
    The Oct. 26 front-page article “ ‘Why would anyone run?’ ” focused on the politics of South Carolina. Maybe it hit too close to home to insert Maryland in place of South Carolina and Democrats in place of Republicans. Read full article >>
  • Unaware of an offensive word’s heritage?

    29 Oct 2014 | 2:40 pm
    Regarding the Oct. 27 front-page article “Embracing ‘Redskins’ ”: Perhaps these particular Navajo people are not aware of the history around the name chosen by the Washington football team. Maybe members of their tribe were not butchered like animals to receive a bounty for a piece of red skin. Members of my family were hunted for their skin. Navajo people are a wonderful group of individuals, but apparently those in the article have not been educated about this issue. Read full article >>
  • A strange no-decision in a Va. congressional race

    28 Oct 2014 | 3:01 pm
    I could hardly believe my eyes when I read The Post’s non-endorsement in the race for Virginia’s 10th Congressional District [“For Congress in N. Virginia,” Oct. 25]. The Post’s editorial board could not choose between a lackluster campaigner with a proven track record of getting things done for Northern Virginia and a partisan opposition researcher who, when given the chance to fund Northern Virginia traffic projects as an elected delegate, bowed down to the tea party and said no? Really? Read full article >>
  • The next mayor should invest in early childhood education

    28 Oct 2014 | 2:59 pm
    The Oct. 24 Metro article “Forum airs mayoral hopefuls’ ideas about schools” did not mention perhaps the most important educational issue facing our next mayor and our city’s children: early childhood education. That’s because the mayoral candidates have neglected this critical issue. The District needs a mayor who will stand up for its youngest residents and their parents by working to build a system of early education from birth to age 5. High-quality early education provides the launching pad for success in school, and successful students lead to stronger communities. Read full…
  • Blue Line woes are a symptom of Metro’s lack of capacity

    26 Oct 2014 | 3:22 pm
    The Nov. 11 Concert for Valor will be a huge event. Many of the up to 800,000 attendees will take Metro. And Metro has decided to cut all Blue Line service on Veterans Day [“Metro plans more trains for Veterans Day concert but will shut down Blue Line,” Metro, Oct. 21]. As a former Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority board member, I know that the board didn’t make that decision lightly. Read full article >>
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Achenblog

  • World Series still not over, scientists discover

    Joel Achenbach
    27 Oct 2014 | 5:22 am
    Yesterday I went for a great hike on the Appalachian Trail, ascending the spine of South Mountain to reach a rocky promontory. Behold the ancient crumpled landscape, the hardwoods rapidly skewing toward the gold and the red, and the river below sparkling as it sliced through the ridges to reach the Piedmont. What I enjoyed […]
  • Ebola and the BP oil spill

    Joel Achenbach
    17 Oct 2014 | 5:59 am
    Life is busy on the Ebola beat. We start at dawn and go to midnight, and fortunately there are people to pick up the slack during the hours when we grab some sleep. The Ebola story reminds me of the BP oil spill. Remember this: Allen has at various times referred to the oil spill […]
  • Ebola fears spread faster than the virus

    Joel Achenbach
    10 Oct 2014 | 10:45 am
    Worried about Ebola? Take a deep breath. This is a terrible crisis in West Africa, but it is exceedingly unlikely that it will become a medical crisis here in the United States. Dallas has seen one tragic case. So far there have been no confirmed additional cases (cross your fingers). Our story today on the […]
  • Paul Farmer on Ebola: “This isn’t a natural disaster, this is the terrorism of poverty”

    Joel Achenbach
    6 Oct 2014 | 5:45 am
    Africa’s Ebola problem is now America’s Ebola problem. The best way for the United States to free itself of the terror of this virus is to ensure that it is wiped out at the source, where the epidemic is currently out of control. That will happen only through a coordinated effort to provide the kind […]
  • The Charmin Dome over the White House

    Joel Achenbach
    30 Sep 2014 | 5:29 am
    Every day my colleague Carol Leonnig has another amazing story about the tissue-thin defensive perimeter around the White House, where apparently you can jump the fence, run across the lawn, barrel through the unlocked front door and scamper around with wild abandon — doing what tourists have always dreamed of doing, like checking out the […]
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Anne Applebaum: Most Recent Articles and Archives

  • Anne Applebaum: Jews celebrate their place in Poland’s history

    Anne Applebaum
    31 Oct 2014 | 1:04 pm
    WARSAW There were ministers and presidents, and an audience full of people from around the world. But at the official opening of the beautiful Museum of the History of Polish Jews in Warsaw last week, there was one speech that stood out from all of the others. In the cold autumn sunlight, Marian Turski got up in front of the crowd and began with the following words: Read full article >>
  • The myth of Russian humiliation

    Anne Applebaum
    17 Oct 2014 | 12:30 pm
    Looking back over the past quarter-century, it isn’t easy to name a Western policy that can truly be described as a success. The impact of Western development aid is debatable. Western interventions in the Middle East have been disastrous. Read full article >>
  • China’s explanation for the Hong Kong protests? Blame America.

    Anne Applebaum
    3 Oct 2014 | 4:18 pm
    More than 50,000 people have filled the streets of Hong Kong in the past few days, and at times the number has climbed higher. The photographs of these gatherings have shown a remarkably calm, remarkably disciplined crowd. Students do their homework on the sidewalk. Others stack up plastic bottles for recycling and sweep the streets. Read full article >>
  • Scotland sends Europe’s elites a warning

    Anne Applebaum
    19 Sep 2014 | 8:44 am
    LONDON In Aberdeenshire, more than 87 percent of people voted on Scotland’s independence referendum; in Clackmannanshire, the number was above 88 percent; in the Western Isles, it was close to 90 percent. One remote Highland peninsula actually achieved a 100 percent turnout — meaning that all 98 residents showed up to vote. Read full article >>
  • War in Europe is not a hysterical idea

    Anne Applebaum
    29 Aug 2014 | 9:20 am
    WARSAW Over and over again — throughout the entirety of my adult life, or so it feels — I have been shown Polish photographs from the beautiful summer of 1939: The children playing in the sunshine, the fashionable women on Krakow streets. I have even seen a picture of a family wedding that took place in June 1939, in the garden of a Polish country house I now own. All of these pictures convey a sense of doom, for we know what happened next. September 1939 brought invasion from both east and west, occupation, chaos, destruction, genocide. Most of the people who attended that June wedding…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Richard Cohen: Most Recent Articles and Archives

  • The 2016 contenders’ weaknesses

    Richard Cohen
    27 Oct 2014 | 4:30 pm
    At dinner the other night with a collection of political consultants, pollsters, some journalists and a few civilians, we went around the table giving our predictions of the presidential nominees for 2016. Some interesting names popped up. One of them was Bill de Blasio, the lefty mayor of New York, and another was Rand Paul, the Kentucky senator who seems to be running for president on a platform of discovering who he is. Elizabeth Warren was also mentioned and so, in a weary sort of way, was Hillary Clinton. Like Paul, she’s looking for a message. Read full article >>
  • Ben Bradlee was a leader and a friend

    Richard Cohen
    21 Oct 2014 | 5:12 pm
    Ben Bradlee would not have liked me to say so, but he was the living refutation of the Declaration of Independence: All men are not created equal. Certainly, he was not. He was born rich and well-connected, a member of the WASP tribe that once ran much of America and nearly all of its prestigious institutions. He was compellingly handsome and so smart that no crossword puzzle could really challenge him. It’s not that he didn’t have a weakness. He did. He was a sucker for the underdog. Read full article >>
  • Ebola caregivers deserve a parade

    Richard Cohen
    20 Oct 2014 | 5:23 pm
    A man my age grows up wondering: Could I have hit the beach at Normandy? How would I have handled being trapped near the Chosin Reservoir in North Korea, thousands of Chinese pouring over the border and a bitter winter coming on fast? What about Vietnam, or later Iraq and then Afghanistan and Iraq again? I come not from the Greatest Generation but the Wondering One — lucky, a reaper of what others have sown, and now, jaw agape, I wonder about health workers who leave the comforts and certainties of the United States and go to Africa to treat Ebola patients. Who are these people? Read full…
  • Internationally, Obama must be feared as well as admired

    Richard Cohen
    13 Oct 2014 | 5:21 pm
    Tell me something: What do you think would happen if the United States concludes that Iran has been cheating and delaying and is about to pop a fully functional nuclear weapons program? Would President Obama respond by joining Israel to bomb the Iranian nuclear facilities to smithereens, or would he stall and equivocate? My bet is the latter and also, just to double down, what I bet the Iranians are betting. They have taken the measure of Obama. He lacks menace. Read full article >>
  • Richard Cohen: The actual value of a college education

    Richard Cohen
    6 Oct 2014 | 5:15 pm
    I never went to college to make money. (A totally successful business plan, by the way.) Instead, I went for an education. (Another totally successful business plan.) To fulfill a requirement, I took anthropology, and I have kept up with it ever since. I reveled in political science and history of all kinds, and I felt for a long time that I had discovered all the secrets of life in psychology, although its Freudian variety left me cold. The id never made much sense to me. Read full article >>
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    E.J. Dionne Columns and Blog Posts

  • EJ Dionne: Moderate thunder out of Kansas

    E.J. Dionne Jr.
    29 Oct 2014 | 3:47 pm
    IOLA, Kan. The several dozen people gathered at a street corner just off the main square of this southeastern Kansas town of 5,600 were polite and friendly in the Midwestern way. They did not look in the least like a band of counterrevolutionaries intent on reversing the direction of the government in Topeka. Read full article >>
  • The secrets behind the midterms

    E.J. Dionne Jr.
    26 Oct 2014 | 4:56 pm
    There’s a hidden history to the nasty midterm election campaign that will, mercifully, end on Nov. 4. What’s not being widely talked about is as important as what’s in the news. Underappreciated fact No. 1: The number of Democratic seats that are not in play this year. Read full article >>
  • EJ Dionne: The politics of Ebola

    E.J. Dionne Jr.
    22 Oct 2014 | 5:19 pm
    BOSTON Seth Moulton, an Iraq veteran and Democratic congressional candidate on Massachusetts’s North Shore, has done something with little precedent in political campaigning: He was caught underplaying his war record. Read full article >>
  • Both parties face a blue-collar imperative

    E.J. Dionne Jr.
    19 Oct 2014 | 3:29 pm
    In Georgia, Democrat Michelle Nunn is giving Republicans a real scare in a Senate race the GOP thought it had put away. Some of her new momentum comes from a sustained attack on David Perdue, her businessman foe, for his work shipping American jobs overseas. Read full article >>
  • When our government was good

    E.J. Dionne Jr.
    15 Oct 2014 | 5:04 pm
    THORNDALE, Pa. Tom Wolf’s mood is sunny but his words are serious. He’s answering teachers’ questions at an elementary school featured last year in a New York Times story about the costs of overcrowding and underinvestment. The Democratic nominee for Pennsylvania governor, Wolf criticizes incumbent Tom Corbett (R) for education cuts, but he is not terribly partisan about it. Wolf is a businessman who also holds a PhD in political science, and he offers a brief commentary on the importance of “public goods,” not a term typically invoked on the stump. Read full article >>
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Michael Gerson: Most Recent Articles and Archives

  • A global attention on disease gives Bill Gates his moment

    Michael Gerson
    30 Oct 2014 | 5:24 pm
    “Ebola has reminded people that it is not just poor people who can die of infectious disease,” Bill Gates tells me, in a characteristically matter-of-fact tone. In a tragic, unsought sense, this is Gates’s moment. The focus of his life — preventable disease — is suddenly the obsession of the world. Gates, who has donated $50 million to the Ebola fight (through his foundation), will give a major address Sunday at the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. According to a preview copy of the speech, he will cover the waterfront of vicious infections, from sleeping sickness…
  • At L’Arche, those at the margins find love at the center

    Michael Gerson
    27 Oct 2014 | 4:41 pm
    In an older, gentrifying, suburban Virginia neighborhood — the kind with porch flags and pumpkins on the front steps — I am welcomed at an indistinguishable door to an exceptional little community called L’Arche. Here, intellectually disabled “core members” are paired with often young and intensely idealistic “assistants” who share their lives, normally for a year or two. (L’Arche has more than 140 such group homes in 35 countries.) Read full article >>
  • Michael Gerson: The world is in denial about Ebola’s true threat

    Michael Gerson
    23 Oct 2014 | 4:55 pm
    It is such a relief about that Ebola thing. The threat of a U.S. outbreak turned out to be overhyped. A military operation is underway to help those poor Liberians. An Ebola czar (what is his name again?) has been appointed to coordinate the U.S. government response. The growth of the disease in Africa, by some reports, seems to have slowed. On to the next crisis. Read full article >>
  • For the GOP, Senate control could be a doubled-edged sword

    Michael Gerson
    20 Oct 2014 | 5:27 pm
    On the theory that chickens should not only be counted before they hatch but also killed, let us consider the downsides for Republicans of winning both houses of Congress. This hypothetical now seems the most likely outcome, according to the various poll aggregators we now treat as oracles. The Post Election Lab, striding furthest out on the ice, puts the odds of a GOP Senate takeover at 93 percent. Read full article >>
  • Ebola challenges America’s ability to adapt

    Michael Gerson
    16 Oct 2014 | 5:42 pm
    In any health care setting, it is wise to listen to the nurses, who see all. Their reports from Dallas about the initial procedures used in treating Thomas Eric Duncan are appalling. Safety suits with exposed necklines left nurses to cover skin with tape. When tape is removed, it abrades the skin. One health expert I consulted described this practice in dealing with Ebola as “moronic.” Read full article >>
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    David Ignatius: Most Recent Articles and Archives

  • Ali Shamkhani is a rising figure in Iranian nuclear talks

    David Ignatius
    30 Oct 2014 | 5:28 pm
    An intriguing figure is gaining prominence in the Iranian government just as regional conflicts in Iraq and Syria intensify and nuclear talks with the West move toward a Nov. 24 deadline. The newly prominent official is Ali Shamkhani, the head of Iran’s national security council. He played a key role last summer in the ouster of Nouri al-Maliki as Iraq’s prime minister. In interviews over the past few weeks, Iraqi, Iranian, Lebanese, European and U.S. officials have all described Shamkhani as a rising political player. Read full article >>
  • Wishful thinking in the U.S. plans against the Islamic State

    David Ignatius
    28 Oct 2014 | 7:34 am
    A glimpse of the anxiety sweeping the Arab world surfaced last week when an Arab woman complained during a talk in Amman at the Columbia Global Center for the Middle East. She said my speech’s title about the “crisis” in the region wasn’t accurate. The correct word was “disintegration.” The audience cheered loudly. Read full article >>
  • David Ignatius: Iraq and the U.S. are losing ground to the Islamic State

    David Ignatius
    23 Oct 2014 | 3:56 pm
    AMMAN, Jordan Jalal al-Gaood, one of the tribal leaders the United States has been cultivating in hopes of rolling back extremists in Iraq, grimly describes how his home town in Anbar province was forced this week to surrender to fighters from the Islamic State. Read full article >>
  • The instinctual greatness of Ben Bradlee

    David Ignatius
    22 Oct 2014 | 5:23 am
    The hardest thing to convey to outsiders about Ben Bradlee was the sheer pleasure of working for him. He took the ordinary work of reporting and editing a newspaper and made it seem like the coolest thing on the planet that a person could possibly do. Read full article >>
  • A small organization offers a fresh approach on preventing terrorism

    David Ignatius
    21 Oct 2014 | 6:04 pm
    ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates Hedayah certainly doesn’t look like a global counterterrorism center. It sits in a quiet villa on Fatima bint Mubarak Street here. It has a staff of 14. Its annual budget wouldn’t begin to cover the cost of an Apache helicopter gunship. Read full article >>
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Ruth Marcus: Most Recent Articles and Archives

  • Why Jeb Bush should run for president

    Ruth Marcus
    28 Oct 2014 | 4:52 pm
    Run, Jeb, run. I mean it, despite two powerful arguments against a presidential run by Jeb Bush — one specific to the former Florida governor, one more generic. Generic first, because it is the more compelling: The thought of a Republican president makes me shudder, largely because of the irreparable harm to the Supreme Court. Legislative and regulatory mistakes can be fixed, albeit at enormous cost and difficulty. (Think George W. Bush’s tax cuts.) Foreign policy blunders are harder to repair. (Think George W. Bush’s war in Iraq.) Read full article >>
  • A call to action from ‘Patient Zero’ Monica Lewinsky

    Ruth Marcus
    21 Oct 2014 | 5:47 pm
    Monica Lewinsky is trying to make lemonade out of 16-year-old lemons. Good for her, and good, ultimately, for us. Not so good, of course, for Hillary Clinton’s nascent presidential campaign, but not fatal either. Lewinsky’s decision to reemerge as a public figure, this time committed to alleviating the scourge of cyberbullying, is awkward. Read full article >>
  • A campaign with no answers

    Ruth Marcus
    17 Oct 2014 | 5:10 pm
    The closing days of a closely fought election rarely offer uplifting moments, but the 2014 season has been particularly dreary, nearly devoid of content and high on unedifying spectacle. Perhaps the iconic moment came when former Florida governor Charlie Crist (D) faced an empty lectern for seven minutes while his Republican opponent, Gov. Rick Scott, sulked over Crist’s insistence that he have a cooling fan at his stand. Seriously, seven minutes. At which point Scott blinked, and the debate that voters deserved could finally start. Read full article >>
  • Ruth Marcus: Actually, flu is the virus you should really be worrying about

    Ruth Marcus
    14 Oct 2014 | 4:36 pm
    If you are worried about contracting Ebola, I have two suggestions. First, stop. Second, get a flu shot. On the first: If you live in the United States, your chances of getting Ebola are vanishingly small — even if you are a health-care worker, or a journalist who travels to Africa to report on the epidemic. Read full article >>
  • Hillary Clinton’s increasing comfort with being a female almost-candidate

    Ruth Marcus
    10 Oct 2014 | 4:19 pm
    The 2008 campaign was the first with a woman as a serious presidential contender, so it was not surprising that gender was an uncomfortable, tiptoe-y subject. The male candidates weren’t sure-footed in dealing with it — recall Barack Obama’s “you’re likable enough, Hillary” and the debate discussion about the color of her jacket. Read full article >>
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Harold Meyerson: Most Recent Articles and Archives

  • Hillary Clinton’s Wall Street problem

    Harold Meyerson
    30 Oct 2014 | 2:15 pm
    Over the past week, the usually redoubtable Hillary Clinton has comported herself like a leaf in a storm. Last Friday, campaigning in Boston for Democratic gubernatorial candidate Martha Coakley, Clinton not only praised Elizabeth Warren, the Massachusetts senator who has won a devoted following as the scourge of big banks; she sounded like her. Read full article >>
  • IBM’s big blues

    Harold Meyerson
    22 Oct 2014 | 5:47 pm
    Big Blue’s got the blues. On Monday, IBM’s stock tumbled by 7 percent after it unveiled a dismal quarterly earnings report that showed a 4 percent drop in revenue — the 10th consecutive quarter of flat or declining sales. Revealing these mournful numbers, the company also announced it would abandon a policy that set it apart from all other firms: the 2010 pledge from then-CEO Sam Palmisano to raise the earnings per share of its stock to $20 by 2015. Read full article >>
  • Economically, Germany is a threat to itself

    Harold Meyerson
    15 Oct 2014 | 5:21 pm
    I am a fan, as a number of my columns attest, of Germany’s worker empowerment. By requiring corporations to divide their boards evenly between worker and management representatives and mandating that employers meet regularly with their employees to discuss and resolve company concerns, Germany has retained a high-end manufacturing sector that has enabled the nation to prosper while every other advanced economy has suffered hard times. Through a government program that provided firms with the funds to keep workers employed part time but at near full-time pay during the 2008-2009 economic…
  • Harold Meyerson: How workers lost the power struggle — and their pay raises

    Harold Meyerson
    8 Oct 2014 | 4:10 pm
    The extinction of the American raise — dead as a dodo, by every empirical measure — has become a truth universally acknowledged. Even Republican House Speaker John Boehner, not a fellow often glimpsed on the barricades with protesting workers, pronounced that “wages are stagnant” in his comments on the most recent employment figures. Read full article >>
  • The trade clause that overrules governments

    Harold Meyerson
    1 Oct 2014 | 4:37 pm
    One of the public policy paradoxes of the past quarter-century is why the center-left governments of advanced economies have supported trade policies that undermine the very environmental and labor protections they fight for at home. Foremost among these self-subverting policies have been the Investor-State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) provisions included in every significant trade deal the United States has signed since Ronald Reagan’s presidency. Under ISDS, foreign investors can sue a nation with which their own country has such treaty arrangements over any rules, regulations or changes in…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Eugene Robinson Columns and Blog Posts

  • Do Republicans have a plan for the country? The answer is ‘no’.

    Eugene Robinson
    30 Oct 2014 | 4:20 pm
    No matter how well Republicans do at the polls Tuesday — and my hunch is they won’t do as well as they hope — the GOP won’t be able to claim any kind of mandate. That’s because they have refused to articulate any vision for governing. Read full article >>
  • The whole story about Ben Bradlee

    Eugene Robinson
    27 Oct 2014 | 4:34 pm
    It was the fall of 1979. The Post, which I considered the greatest newspaper in the world, was considering me for a job covering the District’s new mayor, an interesting character named Marion Barry. I knew that a couple of Post editors were going to take me to lunch. What I didn’t know was that the great Ben Bradlee was coming along. Read full article >>
  • Eugene Robinson: The Islamic State fight is turning into a ‘dumb’ war

    Eugene Robinson
    23 Oct 2014 | 4:12 pm
    “I don’t oppose all wars,” said Barack Obama, then an Illinois state senator, in 2002. “What I am opposed to is a dumb war. What I am opposed to is a rash war.” Few would describe Obama’s use of military force against the Islamic State as rash, given the time he took in deciding to act. But the more we learn about this intervention, the more it appears to violate the “dumb” half of the president’s dictum. The purposes, parameters and prospects of the war are increasingly uncertain. Americans have a right to be concerned about the whole enterprise. Read full article…
  • Elizabeth Warren makes a powerful case

    Eugene Robinson
    20 Oct 2014 | 5:24 pm
    Sen. Elizabeth Warren says she isn’t running for president. At this rate, however, she may have to. The Massachusetts Democrat has become the brightest ideological and rhetorical light in a party whose prospects are dimmed by — to use a word Jimmy Carter never uttered — malaise. Her weekend swing through Colorado, Minnesota and Iowa to rally the faithful displayed something no other potential contender for the 2016 presidential nomination, including Hillary Clinton, seems able to present: a message. Read full article >>
  • On Ebola, we need a dose of candor

    Eugene Robinson
    16 Oct 2014 | 5:22 pm
    Let’s make a deal: We’ll all promise not to panic about Ebola if the experts — especially those at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — agree to get their stories straight. They should begin by giving a better explanation of why they have concluded it would be wrong to “stop the flights” arriving from the Ebola “hot zone,” beginning with the fact that there are no such flights: There is no direct commercial air service between the countries at the epicenter of the outbreak — Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea — and the United States. Read full article >>
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Robert Samuelson: Most Recent Articles and Archives

  • What’s behind wage stagnation?

    Robert J. Samuelson
    29 Oct 2014 | 7:19 am
    If you believe in the law of supply and demand — and I do — there’s not much mystery to the stagnation of wages even though unemployment is falling. In the past year, the economy has added 2.6 million jobs; the unemployment rate has declined to 5.9 percent. But despite the extra jobs, too many potential workers must be chasing too few openings. So wage gains are meager, and the recovery suffers. Case closed? Not really. We know what’s happening, but not why. That’s the intriguing question. Read full article >>
  • The family deficit

    Robert J. Samuelson
    26 Oct 2014 | 4:55 pm
    We Americans believe in progress, and yet progress is often a double-edged sword. The benefits and adventures of change often vie with the shortcomings and disruptions, leaving us in a twilight zone of ambiguity and doubt about the ultimate outcome. Few subjects better illustrate this than the decline of marriage, as Isabel Sawhill shows in her sobering book “Generation Unbound: Drifting into Sex and Parenthood without Marriage.” Read full article >>
  • The millionaire’s club expands

    Robert J. Samuelson
    22 Oct 2014 | 9:14 am
    The millionaire’s club isn’t what it used to be. Time was that “being a millionaire” was a mark of unimaginable success. You’d joined the financial elite. People didn’t much discuss whether you arrived by wealth or income, because it didn’t matter much. The millionaire’s club was so small that the path to membership wasn’t worth discussing. Read full article >>
  • Stock market turmoil and the global debt trap

    Robert J. Samuelson
    16 Oct 2014 | 5:38 pm
    Six years after the onset of the financial crisis, the world still has too much debt. The total in 2013, according to the McKinsey Global Institute, came to about $186 trillion. This includes government debt, corporate bonds and loans to individuals, families and businesses. Since 2008, the amount has actually increased by about $34 trillion. The numbers are so large that it’s hard for ordinary mortals to connect them with the world economy’s ability to grow at a decent and self-sustained pace. Doubts about this underlie the stock market’s recent turmoil. Read full article >>
  • Women join the top 1 percent

    Robert J. Samuelson
    15 Oct 2014 | 8:35 am
    Everyone knows that economic inequality has increased dramatically since the 1970s, and this has created a new cottage industry: dissecting “the top 1 percent.” We now have a study from three economists that broadens what we know about these top earners. The study’s biggest news: Economic inequality is becoming more gender-neutral. Read full article >>
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    George F. Will: Most Recent Articles and Archives

  • Affordable Care Act opponents are cherry-picking their history

    Tom Harkin, Ron Wyden, Sander M. Levin, George Miller, and Henry A. Waxman
    30 Oct 2014 | 12:02 pm
    The Affordable Care Act was created to improve the quality and affordability of health care for all Americans. Indeed, many people who didn’t have — and couldn’t afford — health insurance before the law have it now. Read full article >>
  • George Will: In Georgia, a Republican becomes a capitalist punching bag

    George F. Will
    29 Oct 2014 | 5:13 pm
    MCDONOUGH, GA. In a sun-dappled square decorated with scores of entrants in the community’s Halloween scarecrow contest, a balky sound system enables, if barely, the Republican Senate candidate to exhort a few hundred people, mostly supporters, to urge neighbors to vote to reduce Sen. Harry Reid (D-Nev.) to minority leader. The exhorter is David Perdue, a glutton for punishment who has been campaigning incessantly for 15 months and may be doing so for two more. Read full article >>
  • George F. Will: The nastiest political tactic this year

    George F. Will
    24 Oct 2014 | 5:24 pm
    The early-morning paramilitary-style raids on citizens’ homes were conducted by law enforcement officers, sometimes wearing bulletproof vests and lugging battering rams, pounding on doors and issuing threats. Spouses were separated as the police seized computers, including those of children still in pajamas. Clothes drawers, including the children’s, were ransacked, cellphones were confiscated and the citizens were told that it would be a crime to tell anyone of the raids. Read full article >>
  • With Ben Bradlee as your boss, you didn’t want to miss a scoop

    George Solomon
    22 Oct 2014 | 7:17 pm
    The newspaper clipping would come in a brown office envelope, my name clearly written by the assistant to the executive editor of The Washington Post. Ben Bradlee was not an Internet guy. He never figured out computers or had much appreciation for them, although he did occasionally read an e-mail. He was a newspaper guy; no bookmarks for him. Read full article >>
  • George Will: Restoration of Senate’s dignity rides on Mitch McConnell

    George F. Will
    22 Oct 2014 | 5:28 pm
    LOUISVILLE Barack Obama lost Kentucky in 2012 by 23 points, yet the state remains closely divided about reelecting the man whose parliamentary skills uniquely qualify him to restrain Obama’s executive overreach. So Kentucky’s Senate contest is a constitutional moment that will determine whether the separation of powers will be reasserted by a Congress revitalized by restoration of the Senate’s dignity. Read full article >>
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Going Out Guide

  • Dupont Circle FreshFarm Market experiments with fundraising coffee pop-ups

    Tim Carman
    31 Oct 2014 | 1:47 pm
    After years of wishing, hoping and praying he could sell his freshly roasted beans at the Dupont Circle FreshFarm Market, Qualia Coffee owner Joel Finkelstein will finally get his chance on Sunday. He'll be the first of three D.C. coffee shops and/or roasters to host a fundraising pop-up at the District's premier producers-only market. It's […]
  • Just a reminder: You get an extra hour to party on Saturday night

    Fritz Hahn
    31 Oct 2014 | 1:31 pm
    Clocks are going back while the Dia de los Muertos parties go ahead! Daylight Saving Time ends at 2 a.m. Sunday, when clocks turn back to 1 a.m. As a result, bar-goers throughout the area gain an extra hour of drinking and dancing. Bars must still stop serving alcohol at the usual time -- that's 2 […]
  • Kids’ menus: Is it time to move tots beyond the nuggets?

    Maura Judkis
    31 Oct 2014 | 11:31 am
    All that was left of Julia Washington’s seared-scallop entree were the baby artichokes. The 10-year-old speared one with a fork, eyeing it with curiosity and contempt. “I don’t know about new things. I don’t know how they taste,” the fifth-grader from Upper Marlboro said at the restaurant Equinox. “It looks like a mushroom. I don’t […]
  • ‘Nightcrawler,’ ‘Laggies’ and other new movies, reviewed

    Macy Freeman
    31 Oct 2014 | 8:41 am
    In this week’s new releases, Jake Gyllenhaal plays a young man, who begins filming car accidents, fires and other chaotic events to make a living in “Nightcrawler;” the film receives three stars. Keira Knightley stars in “Laggies.” ★★★ “Nightcrawler” (R) “‘Nightcrawler’s’ most salient — and sobering — point isn’t that soldiers of misfortune such as […]
  • Pansaari brings a chai bar and Indian spice shop to Dupont

    Becky Krystal
    31 Oct 2014 | 7:06 am
    Now that we're girding ourselves for our first legitimately cold blast of the season, it may be time to cozy up to the chai bar at Pansaari. Rano Singh opened her Dupont Circle shop about five weeks ago, which, in addition to tea, sells Indian spices, snacks and sweets. Traditional chai, she explains, consists of […]
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Carolyn Hax: Latest Carolyn Hax Articles, Carolyn Hax Archive

  • Carolyn Hax: Nature of boyfriend’s ‘bromance’ is beside the point

    Carolyn Hax
    30 Oct 2014 | 8:59 pm
    Hi, Carolyn: I’m a 40-something woman living with a 30-something man. I wanted to be engaged first, but he wasn’t ready and insisted this was the only way to move forward with our relationship, so I caved and reluctantly moved in. The alternative was breaking up, and I wasn’t ready to do that. Read full article >>
  • Carolyn Hax: Should couple explain to kin their will’s directive on guardianship?

    Carolyn Hax
    29 Oct 2014 | 8:59 pm
    Adapted from a recent online discussion. Dear Carolyn: My husband and I are sorting out our will and we have come to the part where we have to decide what happens to our kids (ages 4 and 1) if we both die. We live close to my husband’s family and I know his brother and wife would fully expect to get the kids (they have a 1-year-old, too, and have been very involved). Read full article >>
  • Carolyn Hax: Choosing sides in a messy divorce

    Carolyn Hax
    28 Oct 2014 | 8:59 pm
    Hi, Carolyn: My brother and sister-in-law are going through an ugly divorce — with her alleging emotional abuse, him trying to get shared custody of their kids (under 10), his lawyer deposing her family members, her refusing to let him see the kids unless supervised. I’ve been trying to stay out of it, at my father’s request and my brother’s request/demand. Read full article >>
  • Carolyn Hax: How to listen when your kids tell you about their troubles

    Carolyn Hax
    27 Oct 2014 | 8:59 pm
    Adapted from a recent online discussion. Dear Carolyn: I sometimes have a hard time discerning when to listen to my daughter and when to move the fainting sofa. I don’t want to suppress her, but I can’t stand the day-to-day drama of ultimately trivial problems. It probably doesn’t help that my family moved to the United States to avoid persecution in our old country (my father was a prisoner/slave laborer for years) and that your waffles are a little burned is actually not that important to me. Any ideas? Read full article >>
  • Carolyn Hax: Faced with an unsympathetic spouse, it’s time to learn how to speak up

    Carolyn Hax
    26 Oct 2014 | 8:59 pm
    Adapted from a recent online discussion. Hi, Carolyn: I do not know how to talk to my husband about a problem. It seems like he takes everything away from me. If I say, “I’m cold,” he says, “It’s not cold in here!” If something upsets me, he tells me there is no reason to be upset. I have really tried to control my emotions, but sometimes I wonder, why can’t I be upset? Why can’t I even have my own feelings? Is there any way to express this, or am I just stuck, being quiet? Read full article >>
 
Log in