Washington Post

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  • Jeb Bush’s optimism school

    E.J. Dionne Columns and Blog Posts
    E.J. Dionne Jr.
    16 Apr 2014 | 5:58 pm
    NEW YORK The Republican Party faces a long-term challenge in presidential elections because it is defining itself as a gloomy enclave, a collection of pessimists who fear what our country is becoming and where it is going. Read full article >>
  • Here’s the first story the Washington Post ever wrote about Hillary Clinton. In 1969.

    The Fix
    Masuma Ahuja
    24 Apr 2014 | 12:49 pm
    The former first lady, secretary of state, 2016 hopeful and grandmother-to-be was making waves long before she appeared on the national political stage. Digging through The Washington Post archives, we found the first-ever mention of Hillary Clinton, then Hillary Rodham, in The Post on June 8, 1969. The article, published a few days after Rodham's graduation […]
  • Here’s why Obamacare is still a major problem for Democrats

    The Fix
    Chris Cillizza
    24 Apr 2014 | 11:32 am
    Buried in new New York Times/Kaiser polling on four Southern Senate races is this question: "Is it possible you would ever vote for a candidate who does not share your views on the 2010 health care law, or is this issue so important that you would not vote for a candidate who disagrees with you?" And here's […]
  • This is one of the best political ads of 2014

    The Fix
    Chris Cillizza
    24 Apr 2014 | 12:57 pm
    Positive ads are having a bit of a renaissance in politics these days. And here's one of the best we've seen. It's an ad for Monica Wehby, a doctor running for the Republican nomination for U.S. Senate in Oregon produced by FP1 Strategies. And man is it good. Why? Because it: a) Shows rather than […]
  • Keystone XL’s continued delay is absurd

    Washington Post Editorials: Latest Editorial and Editorial Archive
    Editorial Board
    23 Apr 2014 | 4:04 pm
    IF FOOT-DRAGGING were a competitive sport, President Obama and his administration would be world champions for their performance in delaying the approval of the Keystone XL pipeline. Last Friday afternoon, the time when officials make announcements they hope no one will notice, the State Department declared that it is putting off a decision on Keystone XL indefinitely — or at least, it seems, well past November’s midterm elections. This time, the excuse is litigation in Nebraska over the proposed route, because that might lead to a change in the project that various federal agencies will…
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    The Fix

  • President Obama added basketball players, a ballerina and a celebrity chef to his administration today

    Jaime Fuller
    24 Apr 2014 | 3:34 pm
    When the White House sends out a press release on key administration posts, you don't expect to see names that most -- ok, any -- Americans would recognize. But not today! President Obama announced the appointment of five people to his Council on Fitness, Sports and Nutrition -- which first lady Michelle Obama helped launch […]
  • John Kerry brought his dog to work. Then the dog jumped on him.

    Chris Cillizza
    24 Apr 2014 | 2:15 pm
    Thursday was bring your child to work day. (Whoops! Sorry Fix Jr. and Fix III. Or, you're welcome.) And, since Secretary of State John Kerry's kids are all grown up, he brought his dog, a dog who has a human name. His name is Ben. And he has his own Twitter handle -- @diplomutt. Get […]
  • This is one of the best political ads of 2014

    Chris Cillizza
    24 Apr 2014 | 12:57 pm
    Positive ads are having a bit of a renaissance in politics these days. And here's one of the best we've seen. It's an ad for Monica Wehby, a doctor running for the Republican nomination for U.S. Senate in Oregon produced by FP1 Strategies. And man is it good. Why? Because it: a) Shows rather than […]
  • Here’s the first story the Washington Post ever wrote about Hillary Clinton. In 1969.

    Masuma Ahuja
    24 Apr 2014 | 12:49 pm
    The former first lady, secretary of state, 2016 hopeful and grandmother-to-be was making waves long before she appeared on the national political stage. Digging through The Washington Post archives, we found the first-ever mention of Hillary Clinton, then Hillary Rodham, in The Post on June 8, 1969. The article, published a few days after Rodham's graduation […]
  • Here’s why Obamacare is still a major problem for Democrats

    Chris Cillizza
    24 Apr 2014 | 11:32 am
    Buried in new New York Times/Kaiser polling on four Southern Senate races is this question: "Is it possible you would ever vote for a candidate who does not share your views on the 2010 health care law, or is this issue so important that you would not vote for a candidate who disagrees with you?" And here's […]
 
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    Washington Post Editorials: Latest Editorial and Editorial Archive

  • Saudi Arabia’s MERS virus outbreak demands transparency

    Editorial Board
    24 Apr 2014 | 4:59 pm
    ON SUNDAY, the Saudi health minister, Abdullah al-Rabiah, struck a reassuring tone as the kingdom reported a surge in cases of Middle East respiratory syndrome, a novel coronavirus known as MERS. The minister said he didn’t know why the case count had spiked but maybe it was seasonal. He said he didn’t think it necessary to change preventive measures and insisted that authorities were taking all due precautions. Read full article >>
  • The FDA begins evaluating the risks and benefits offered by cigarette alternatives

    Editorial Board
    24 Apr 2014 | 4:59 pm
    IN 2009, Congress gave the Food and Drug Administration wide authority to oversee tobacco products. The agency has moved cautiously in flexing that power. On Thursday, for the first time, the FDA “deemed” several tobacco products to be under its watch, including cigars, pipe tobacco, nicotine gels, hookahs and e-cigarettes. This move is welcome, if overdue. The FDA now has to conduct the tricky work of figuring out when further restrictions, particularly on e-cigarettes, help and when they might actually harm public health. Read full article >>
  • Virginia plays chicken with Medicaid

    Editorial Board
    24 Apr 2014 | 4:58 pm
    WHEN STATE governments shut down, people notice that something is badly amiss, possibly even more so than when the federal government closes. In Virginia, where Republicans in the House of Delegates have dug in their heels against Gov. Terry McAuliffe’s plan to expand Medicaid, the possibility of a shutdown this summer is growing, and the experience in other states is not exactly heartening. Read full article >>
  • The U.S. intelligence chief’s gag order does not stir trust

    Editorial Board
    23 Apr 2014 | 4:04 pm
    AT A time when U.S. intelligence agencies need to regain the confidence and support of the American people, James R. Clapper Jr., the director of national intelligence, is taking a huge backward step. In a directive dated March 20 but disclosed only Monday, Mr. Clapper has restricted the circumstances under which intelligence-community employees can talk to the news media, even about unclassified information. The directive, No. 119, “Media Contacts,” is overly broad and wrongheaded and will prove counterproductive. Read full article >>
  • Keystone XL’s continued delay is absurd

    Editorial Board
    23 Apr 2014 | 4:04 pm
    IF FOOT-DRAGGING were a competitive sport, President Obama and his administration would be world champions for their performance in delaying the approval of the Keystone XL pipeline. Last Friday afternoon, the time when officials make announcements they hope no one will notice, the State Department declared that it is putting off a decision on Keystone XL indefinitely — or at least, it seems, well past November’s midterm elections. This time, the excuse is litigation in Nebraska over the proposed route, because that might lead to a change in the project that various federal agencies will…
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    Today's Opinion Columns

  • The strange tension between theology and science

    Michael Gerson
    24 Apr 2014 | 5:10 pm
    In the late 1920s, astronomer Edwin Hubble established that the light we detect from galaxies is shifted toward the redder colors of the spectrum, indicating that they are moving away from us at enormous speeds. And the farther away galaxies are, the faster they are fleeing. Rewinding that expansion through mathematics — dividing distance by speed — indicates that something extraordinary happened about 14 billion years ago, when the entire universe was small, dense and exceedingly hot. Read full article >>
  • The court stacks the deck against minorities

    Eugene Robinson
    24 Apr 2014 | 5:08 pm
    Affirmative action has opened doors for disadvantaged minorities and made this a fairer, more equal society. The Supreme Court under Chief Justice John Roberts apparently wants no more of that. This week’s big ruling — upholding a Michigan constitutional amendment that bans public universities from considering race in admissions — claims to leave affirmative action alive, if on life support. But the court’s opinion, ignoring precedent and denying reality, can be read only as an invitation for other states to follow suit. Read full article >>
  • Finally getting it right on affirmative action

    Charles Krauthammer
    24 Apr 2014 | 5:08 pm
    Every once in a while a great, conflicted country gets an insoluble problem exactly right. Such is the Supreme Court’s ruling this week on affirmative action. It upheld a Michigan referendum prohibiting the state from discriminating either for or against any citizen on the basis of race. Read full article >>
  • College is not a losing investment

    Catherine Rampell
    24 Apr 2014 | 5:06 pm
    College enrollment is dropping again — and that’s a bad thing. A Labor Department report released this week finds that the share of young people enrolled in college by the October after they graduate from high school has tumbled in the past few years. From a high of 70.1 percent in 2009, it was down to 65.9 percent in 2013. Other reports have found similar declines in enrollment for the entire universe of college students, not just those coming directly out of high school. Read full article >>
  • America should work to bring Asia into the club

    Fareed Zakaria
    24 Apr 2014 | 5:02 pm
    Foreign policy commands attention when it is crisis management. A street revolt breaks out in Egypt or Libya or Ukraine, and everyone asks how the president of the United States should respond. This is an important element of America’s role in the world, but it is essentially reactive and tactical. The broader challenge is to lay down a longer-term strategy that endures after crises. The Obama administration has tried to do this with its Asia policy — and the president’s trip there this week is part of it — but progress has been halting and incomplete. Still, the real threat to a…
 
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    Local Letters

  • The snob appeal of single drivers in high-occupancy lanes

    24 Apr 2014 | 2:01 pm
    Regarding the April 22 editorial “A HOT idea for D.C. traffic”: How, exactly, do high-occupancy toll lanes relieve congestion? Given that a single driver can use such a lane as long as he or she is willing to pay for the privilege, these lanes give people who can afford them the opportunity to move faster while taking as much space as they always have. There may even be some snob appeal for such drivers to flaunt their privilege to those stuck in traffic. High-occupancy-vehicle lanes, on the other hand, provide a straightforward incentive to get more people on the same amount of highway.
  • Prince George’s parents’ income doesn’t determine their engagement in education

    23 Apr 2014 | 3:01 pm
    Regarding the April 22 Metro article “Md. district is gaining students”: The commitment of Prince George’s County Executive Rushern L. Baker III (D) and Board of Education Chairman Segun C. Eubanks to increasing middle-class enrollment in the schools is an important part of building a sustainably high-achieving system. However, I question Mr. Baker’s comment that “a lot of engaged parents live in Prince George’s County, but they don’t send their children to our public schools.” Is Mr. Baker confusing the income levels of families with their engagement with their children’s…
  • D.C. fails to capture earnings from infrastructure investments

    22 Apr 2014 | 3:03 pm
    I agree with everything Roger K. Lewis wrote in his April 19 Real Estate column, “The dangers of taking our infrastructure for granted,” with one exception. Mr. Lewis was correct to urge us to think regionally about infrastructure and to avoid postponing maintenance, lest we face declining services and actual danger from failing bridges, obsolete school buildings, pothole-laden roads, leaking water systems and the like. But he missed the mark when he said that “capital investments far beyond the fiscal capacity of today’s local, state and federal budgets” are needed to keep these…
  • D.C. can tackle several aesthetic problems

    21 Apr 2014 | 2:54 pm
    Regarding the April 18 letters “Trashing the District’s image”: In none of the comments or letters that I saw in response to the April 14 Metro article “Taking the bloom off the blossoms” was there any suggestion that visitors to the Mall should adhere to the backpackers’ credo: Leave no trace . In other words, whatever you take in you bring out. If everyone did that, there would be no need for even one trash can. Read full article >>
  • U.S. military should be proud, even of no-win situations

    21 Apr 2014 | 2:53 pm
    Stephen Perlman [“The U.S. didn’t lose in Afghanistan,” letters, April 19] answered the arguments Andrew J. Bacevich made in his April 13 Outlook commentary, “Why veterans are proud of wars we didn’t win,” with questions of his own, including, “On what metrics is he basing his argument?” Read full article >>
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    Achenblog

  • Why few people are paying attention to today’s spacewalk

    Joel Achenbach
    23 Apr 2014 | 4:53 am
    There’s a spacewalk on the International Space Station starting at 9:30 a.m. Spacewalks are always delicate matters. You may recall that last summer an Italian astronaut, Luca Parmitano, nearly drowned during a spacewalk. There was a malfunction in his suit that caused water to leak throughout his helmet. Water in zero-G acts in funny ways […]
  • Time change (Part 1)

    Joel Achenbach
    21 Apr 2014 | 2:38 am
    The trouble with the modern world is that we’ve lost our ability to understand and control time.* Time used to be something we used to our advantage. Plant a seed, add some water, and time did the rest (barring a plague of locusts). Time healed all wounds. Time begat wisdom. We revered our elders and […]
  • Somewhere in Portugal

    Joel Achenbach
    17 Apr 2014 | 6:07 am
    I’ve had almost no Internet access for my laptop, which was pretty much the whole idea of the vacation. Modern life has too much Internet access, on this we can all agree. In the old days we’d all walk down the sidewalk with eyes open, checking out the landscape, window shopping, people-watching, but now we’re […]
  • Journalism is aggregation

    Joel Achenbach
    9 Apr 2014 | 5:24 am
    While reporting a story last week I had a sudden revelation: I’m an aggregator. I’m one of them. I’m the person that I’ve been kvetching about for years now. “They think information wants to be stolen.” You know the rant. What happened was, I was going through the Rolodex to find astrobiology sources, and I […]
  • Why there are no fish on Saturn’s moon Enceladus

    Joel Achenbach
    4 Apr 2014 | 7:31 am
    It’s a great time to be an astrobiologist! Things are hopping out there in alien-life land. Well, let’s not get overheated about it: Nothing literally hops, so far, when it comes to extraterrestrial life. We can’t even find anything slithering, oozing or just coating the surface of a rock. We’re not greedy: We’d settle for […]
 
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    Anne Applebaum: Most Recent Articles and Archives

  • A fearful new world, imperiled by Russia’s subterfuge

    Anne Applebaum
    16 Apr 2014 | 3:08 pm
    WARSAW In the Western imagination, the words “war” and “invasion” carry clear connotations. From books, movies and television, we know that such events involve tanks, airplanes and artillery, as well as soldiers in uniform, advanced weaponry, sophisticated communications. They look like the invasion of Iraq or, to go back in time, D-Day. Read full article >>
  • Russia’s anti-Western ideology has global consequences

    Anne Applebaum
    28 Mar 2014 | 4:37 pm
    TBILISI, Georgia Halfway through an otherwise coherent conversation with a Georgian lawyer here — the topics included judges, the court system, the police — I was startled by a comment he made about his country’s former government, led by then-president Mikheil Saakashvili. “They were LGBT,” he said, conspiratorially. Read full article >>
  • A need to contain Russia

    Anne Applebaum
    20 Mar 2014 | 5:52 pm
    LONDON There have been high moments: Bill Clinton and Boris Yeltsin, locked in a bear hug; George W. Bush looking into Vladimir Putin’s eyes and seeing “a sense of his soul”; Hillary Clinton pressing the “reset button.” There have been some very low moments, too. But for more than 20 years of Russian independence, a single narrative about Russia in the West has nevertheless prevailed. Read full article >>
  • Russia’s Western enablers

    Anne Applebaum
    5 Mar 2014 | 4:44 pm
    Back in 2006, an energy company called Rosneft floated itself on the London Stock Exchange. Even for a Russian company, its prospectus, as I noted at the time, contained some unusual warnings. “Crime and corruption could create a difficult business climate in Russia,” the document noted; some directors’ interests “may cause Rosneft to engage in business practices that do not maximize shareholder value.” Read full article >>
  • The pressure is on Ukraine

    Anne Applebaum
    27 Feb 2014 | 12:45 pm
    The editor of a publication that will remain unnamed called me the other day wanting to know what I thought: Would Russia invade Ukraine before midnight? She needed to know before her deadline. I didn’t have any inside information, but I guessed: No, I told her, I didn’t think Russia would invade Ukraine ­— because it doesn’t need to. Read full article >>
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    Richard Cohen: Most Recent Articles and Archives

  • A Putin affiliate evokes Hitler. The West should be worried.

    Richard Cohen
    21 Apr 2014 | 4:11 pm
    Is Andranik Migranyan right? The head of a think tank associated with Vladimir Putin wrote the following in response to critics who liken the Russian president to Adolf Hitler and what he did so long ago: “One must distinguish between Hitler before 1939 and Hitler after 1939. The thing is that Hitler collected [German] lands. If he had become famous only for uniting without a drop of blood Germany with Austria, Sudetenland and Memel, in fact completing what Bismarck failed to do, and if he had stopped there, then he would have remained a politician of the highest class.” Read full article…
  • The GOP’s amateur hour

    Richard Cohen
    14 Apr 2014 | 4:39 pm
    Not to put too fine a point on it, but what has Rand Paul ever done? Oh, sure, he’s a member of the U.S. Senate, but only a freshman, and it’s the only political office he has held. He’s an ophthalmologist, a father, a husband and the son of Ron Paul, who used to run for president. So now it is son Rand who is doing so. Aside from family tradition, the question is why? Read full article >>
  • In ‘The Unknown Known,’ Rumsfeld loses the battle with truth

    Richard Cohen
    7 Apr 2014 | 4:49 pm
    There is a moment, a mere moment, when Donald Rumsfeld’s eyes well up and he chokes a bit. This comes in Errol Morris’s documentary “The Unknown Known,” in which Rumsfeld mentions visiting the wounded of the Iraq war. It is then that we get a glance at the man who should not be able to sleep at night but from all the evidence does — soundly. Socrates said the unexamined life is not worth living. Maybe. But in Rumsfeld’s case, it is certainly worth watching. Read full article >>
  • Richard Cohen: General Motors’ wrecked morality

    Richard Cohen
    1 Apr 2014 | 7:49 am
    He was known as “Engine Charlie.” And while Charles Erwin Wilson was both the longtime president of General Motors and Dwight D. Eisenhower’s defense secretary, he is best known for supposedly saying, “What is good for the country is good for General Motors and vice versa.” I couldn’t agree with that more. What would be good for both is if the proper parties were condemned to drive the cars they made. Read full article >>
  • Why the study of Vladi­mir Putin is so important

    Richard Cohen
    24 Mar 2014 | 5:24 pm
    “ ‘Sophie, Sophie, don’t die! Stay alive for the children,’ the dying Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand urged his wife as she slumped over him in the open-topped sports car. But Gavrilo Princip’s shot had already killed her. A bodyguard asked Franz Ferdinand if he was in pain. ‘It’s nothing!’ he replied repeatedly. Those were his last words.” Read full article >>
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    E.J. Dionne Columns and Blog Posts

  • How Democrats can woo swing voters and hold onto their base

    E.J. Dionne Jr.
    23 Apr 2014 | 5:03 pm
    CHICAGO The Democrats’ biggest strategic challenge in maintaining control of the Senate involves motivating the party’s base while simultaneously attracting swing and even Republican voters in contests being waged in conservative states. Read full article >>
  • An interview with New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio

    E.J. Dionne Jr.
    20 Apr 2014 | 4:02 pm
    NEW YORK Last Wednesday afternoon, I interviewed New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio (D) in his office at New York’s City Hall. Here is a transcript of the interview, which is the basis of my Monday column on de Blasio and the city. My questions have been shortened and I have included some background on issues that might not be familiar to those who live outside New York. My thanks to Ross Tilchin and Jeremy Waldron for helping me put together this transcript. Read full article >>
  • New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio stays on offense

    E.J. Dionne Jr.
    20 Apr 2014 | 3:46 pm
    NEW YORK To say that New York Mayor Bill de Blasio is unbowed after some difficult moments in his first few months in office is not entirely true. The 6-foot-5 progressive bows regularly so he won’t overwhelm interlocutors who don’t meet NBA specs. Read full article >>
  • Jeb Bush’s optimism school

    E.J. Dionne Jr.
    16 Apr 2014 | 5:58 pm
    NEW YORK The Republican Party faces a long-term challenge in presidential elections because it is defining itself as a gloomy enclave, a collection of pessimists who fear what our country is becoming and where it is going. Read full article >>
  • A program conservatives should love

    E.J. Dionne Jr.
    13 Apr 2014 | 4:41 pm
    We are at a point at which we will soon have vicious ideological debates over motherhood and apple pie. Don’t laugh. If we can agree on anything across our philosophical divides, surely we can support efforts to promote voluntary service by our fellow citizens and to strengthen our nation’s extraordinary network of civic and religious charities. Read full article >>
 
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    Michael Gerson: Most Recent Articles and Archives

  • The strange tension between theology and science

    Michael Gerson
    24 Apr 2014 | 5:10 pm
    In the late 1920s, astronomer Edwin Hubble established that the light we detect from galaxies is shifted toward the redder colors of the spectrum, indicating that they are moving away from us at enormous speeds. And the farther away galaxies are, the faster they are fleeing. Rewinding that expansion through mathematics — dividing distance by speed — indicates that something extraordinary happened about 14 billion years ago, when the entire universe was small, dense and exceedingly hot. Read full article >>
  • Barry Goldwater’s loss should be a warning to the GOP, not a rallying cry

    Michael Gerson
    17 Apr 2014 | 4:19 pm
    The 50th anniversary of the passage of the Civil Rights Act is also the 50th anniversary of the presumptive Republican nominee for president, Barry Goldwater, voting against the Civil Rights Act. Goldwater, his defenders effectively argue, was not a racist, only an ideologue. True enough. He had been a founding member of the Arizona NAACP. He helped integrate the Phoenix public schools. His problems with the Civil Rights Act were theoretical and libertarian — an objection to the extension of federal power over private enterprise. Read full article >>
  • In the Central African Republic, the only rule is terror

    Michael Gerson
    14 Apr 2014 | 4:38 pm
    BANGUI, Central African Republic The tents of displaced people reach nearly up to the runway at the airport — the first impression of a nation in flight and in fear. Befitting the sectarian cast of the violence in this country, there are two camps, one Christian and one Muslim. The Muslim camp has shrunken in size, as Chadian planes and truck convoys have taken some people out of danger. It is both a move to safety and the victory of religious cleansing. Read full article >>
  • Remembering and learning from Rwanda’s victims

    Michael Gerson
    10 Apr 2014 | 4:31 pm
    KIGALI, Rwanda At the 20th commemoration of the Rwandan genocide, the most moving moments were unplanned. In the audience at Amahoro Stadium, first one woman, then another, then dozens in turn, cried out in uncontrollable anguish and had to be escorted from the ceremony. They were overwhelmed by memory. In their screams you could hear the screams of two decades ago. Read full article >>
  • Obamacare has spawned a misguided debate

    Michael Gerson
    7 Apr 2014 | 4:50 pm
    Supporters of Obamacare are celebrating that the law is not an unmitigated disaster, just a mitigated one. As enrollment closed (for most) on March 31, the system passed 7 million exchange sign-ups. What some are taking as a triumph of governmental competence was actually an emergency rescue by private-sector volunteers after a laughable failure of government to construct and run its own system. This has hardly been a confidence-builder when it comes to public faith in bureaucracy. But never mind. Read full article >>
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    David Ignatius: Most Recent Articles and Archives

  • Closer, but still no deal on Iran

    David Ignatius
    22 Apr 2014 | 5:10 pm
    As the Iran nuclear talks reach roughly the halfway point in the six-month timetable for negotiating a comprehensive agreement, both sides report slow, steady progress in closing gaps — but no deal yet. Read full article >>
  • Has the Ukraine crisis been defused?

    David Ignatius
    17 Apr 2014 | 5:03 pm
    Has the Obama administration really found the famous “exit ramp” in Ukraine that will provide an eventual diplomatic resolution of the crisis? It’s too early to know, but there were certainly signs of progress Thursday in Geneva, where seven hours of negotiations produced what Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov called “a compromise, of sorts.” Read full article >>
  • The cost of Putin’s adventurism in Ukraine

    David Ignatius
    15 Apr 2014 | 12:58 pm
    As President Obama looks at the Ukraine crisis, he sees an asymmetry of interests: Simply put, the future of Ukraine means more to Vladimir Putin’s Russia than it does to the United States or Europe. For Putin, this is an existential crisis; for the West, so far, it isn’t — as the limited U.S. and European response has demonstrated. Read full article >>
  • Warning signs of trouble in China’s markets

    David Ignatius
    10 Apr 2014 | 4:33 pm
    China’s financial markets seem to be signaling trouble, as a government crackdown on corruption and loose credit begins to bite and jittery local investors scramble for safety. China remains an opaque country, and even the most knowledgeable experts say they aren’t sure how to read the tea leaves. But the warning signs are growing that, after decades of economic expansion and exploding wealth, China is moving toward the scary side of the perpetual seesaw between greed and fear that drives financial markets. Read full article >>
  • Putin steals the CIA’s playbook on anti-Soviet covert operations

    David Ignatius
    8 Apr 2014 | 5:41 pm
    The West has made NATO’s military alliance the heart of its response to Russia’s power grab in Ukraine. But we may be fighting the wrong battle: The weapons Russian President Vladimir Putin has used in Crimea and eastern Ukraine look more like paramilitary “covert action” than conventional military force. Read full article >>
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    Ruth Marcus: Most Recent Articles and Archives

  • Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and the subtlety of a court retirement

    Ruth Marcus
    22 Apr 2014 | 5:09 pm
    The law operates with bright-line rules but also with balancing tests and concerns over image. The appearance of impropriety. The appearance of corruption. And so it is with lawyers, starting at the top. Read full article >>
  • Dartmouth president could give us all a lesson on campus behavior

    Ruth Marcus
    18 Apr 2014 | 5:20 pm
    If you are the proud parent of a Dartmouth student, you should send a thank-you note to President Philip Hanlon. Actually, if you are the proud parent of a college student anywhere, or one nearing college age, you should also drop Hanlon a line. Read full article >>
  • The lessons of ‘Camp David’

    Ruth Marcus
    15 Apr 2014 | 4:30 pm
    The line between determination and delusion can be obscure. Sometimes, the distinction emerges only in retrospect, like a Polaroid image slowly appearing. In other instances, the difference between productive grit and self-defeating obsession is an artifact of chance, like the lucky bounce of a tennis ball at match point. Read full article >>
  • Democrats’ revolting equal-pay demagoguery

    Ruth Marcus
    9 Apr 2014 | 4:39 pm
    Here’s a radical notion: It is simultaneously possible to believe that women are entitled to equal pay and to not support the Paycheck Fairness Act. Not that you’d know it from the rhetoric President Obama and fellow Democrats are happily flinging at Republicans who dare to oppose the measure. Read full article >>
  • The emotional double standard applied to Sen. Feinstein

    Ruth Marcus
    8 Apr 2014 | 5:23 am
    Let’s have a rational discussion about the word “emotional.” But first, I’d better calm down. Maybe I’ll have a soothing cup of herbal tea and pet the cat. Oh wait, I don’t have a cat. Which is lucky for former CIA director Michael Hayden, or else we’d both be so overwrought we’d be clawing his eyes out over his diss of Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.). Read full article >>
 
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    Harold Meyerson: Most Recent Articles and Archives

  • Progressives take Manhattan, and many other U.S. cities

    Harold Meyerson
    23 Apr 2014 | 5:05 pm
    Twenty years ago, half of America’s dozen largest cities had Republican mayors. Today, just one does. Of the 30 largest U.S. cities, 26 have Democratic mayors — the greatest partisan imbalance perhaps since the presidency of James Monroe, when the nation had only one political party. Read full article >>
  • Democrats need to replace Andrew Cuomo

    Harold Meyerson
    16 Apr 2014 | 5:22 pm
    New York’s Democrats are a liberal lot. Ever since two young state legislators, Al Smith and Robert Wagner, authored the pioneering bills that outlawed a host of labor abuses in the wake of the 1911 Triangle Shirtwaist fire, New York’s Democratic elected officials and voters have been at the forefront of social reform. As governor, Franklin Roosevelt initiated public works and public jobs programs that became a model for those he implemented as president. In recent decades, New Yorkers have increasingly voted for Democratic candidates, and for increasingly liberal Democratic candidates.
  • LBJ’s triumphs — and failures — weren’t his alone

    Harold Meyerson
    11 Apr 2014 | 4:14 pm
    It is, deservedly, Lyndon Johnson’s moment. This week, three former presidents and the current one all journeyed to Johnson’s presidential library in Austin to commemorate the 50th anniversary of his signing the 1964 Civil Rights Act into law. Read full article >>
  • How capitalism enriches the few rather than the many

    Harold Meyerson
    2 Apr 2014 | 4:39 pm
    Michael Lewis’s “Flash Boys,” his takedown of high-speed stock trading, may be making headlines this week, but it’s just one of two books on our economic dysfunctions that are flying off the shelves. While “Flash Boys” explains how the fastest-growing form of trading enriches the few at the expense of the many, the other book, Thomas Piketty’s “Capital in the Twenty-First Century,” provides a more fundamental and disquieting explanation: how capitalism itself enriches the few at the expense of the many. Read full article >>
  • The coming job apocalypse

    Harold Meyerson
    26 Mar 2014 | 5:09 pm
    As a general rule, more Americans work than do the citizens of other advanced economies. Since the late 1970s, when the number of women in the workforce ballooned, the share of Americans who either had jobs or were trying to get one was greater than the share of comparable Europeans. For reasons good and bad — the higher availability of jobs, the need to bolster stagnating incomes, the linkage of jobs to health insurance — Americans worked like the dickens. Read full article >>
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    Eugene Robinson Columns and Blog Posts

  • The court stacks the deck against minorities

    Eugene Robinson
    24 Apr 2014 | 5:08 pm
    Affirmative action has opened doors for disadvantaged minorities and made this a fairer, more equal society. The Supreme Court under Chief Justice John Roberts apparently wants no more of that. This week’s big ruling — upholding a Michigan constitutional amendment that bans public universities from considering race in admissions — claims to leave affirmative action alive, if on life support. But the court’s opinion, ignoring precedent and denying reality, can be read only as an invitation for other states to follow suit. Read full article >>
  • Remembering Gabriel García Márquez, and Macondo

    Eugene Robinson
    21 Apr 2014 | 4:11 pm
    Years before I met him, Gabriel García Márquez changed my life. “One Hundred Years of Solitude” gave me a new way of looking at the world. The label “magical realism” does not begin to capture the poetry of García Márquez’s imagination or the evocative power of his prose. Reading his masterpiece was like stepping through a portal into a Technicolor reality where the streets are paved with metaphor and the air is fragrant with dreams. Read full article >>
  • On climate, business as usual

    Eugene Robinson
    17 Apr 2014 | 5:03 pm
    The world’s predicament on climate change reminds me of an old saying: “The hurrier I go, the behinder I get.” Despite mounting evidence that global warming is an urgent crisis, emissions of heat-trapping greenhouse gases grew faster between 2000 and 2010 than over the previous three decades, according to an authoritative new report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Read full article >>
  • Obamacare’s victory lap

    Eugene Robinson
    14 Apr 2014 | 4:38 pm
    It’s all over but the shouting: Obamacare is working. All the naysaying in the world can’t drown out mounting evidence that the Affordable Care Act, President Obama’s signature domestic achievement, is a real success. Republican candidates running this fall on an anti-Obamacare platform will have to divert voters’ attention from the facts, which tell an increasingly positive story. Read full article >>
  • Here’s an emotional response to the torture report: I’m outraged

    Eugene Robinson
    7 Apr 2014 | 4:49 pm
    Torture is immoral, illegal and irreconcilable with this nation’s most cherished values. If defenders of the CIA’s “enhanced interrogation” program disagree, they should come out and say so. Instead, they blow smoke. Read full article >>
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    Robert Samuelson: Most Recent Articles and Archives

  • Media bias explained in two studies

    Robert J. Samuelson
    23 Apr 2014 | 8:55 am
    Matthew Gentzkow is the man who explained why the media are like ice cream. Gentzkow, who teaches at the University of Chicago, has just won the John Bates Clark Medal for an outstanding American economist under 40 (he’s 38). He has some interesting ideas about the modern media, which he culled by studying traditional media. Namely, newspapers. Read full article >>
  • Class warfare justified?

    Robert J. Samuelson
    20 Apr 2014 | 3:52 pm
    Thomas Piketty has taken America’s liberal establishment by storm. Piketty is a French economist who has written a lengthy (577 pages) study, “Capital in the Twenty-First Century,” intended to provide a powerful intellectual justification for attacking the super-rich. Surprisingly, “Capital” hit No. 16 on the New York Times’ best-seller list for hardcover nonfiction books — a considerable feat for an academic treatise that, though clearly written, is no page-turner. Read full article >>
  • Give us back our statistical data

    Robert J. Samuelson
    16 Apr 2014 | 8:25 am
    In this age of Big Data, the Obama administration seems determined to make it hard for average Americans to get little data. Recall that in 2011, the Census Bureau decided to eliminate “The Statistical Abstract of the United States,” first published in 1878. This was the nation’s best compilation of figures on hundreds of topics, ranging from birth rates to forest fires to wage rates to voting patterns. The Census Bureau said that it couldn’t afford the Stat Abstract (the savings were trivial, about $3 million) and that most figures were online. Read full article >>
  • The idleness trap

    Robert J. Samuelson
    13 Apr 2014 | 4:40 pm
    If you know someone among the long-term unemployed — a category that includes workers who have been jobless at least six months, but in many cases much longer — you understand what a frustrating and demoralizing experience it is, especially for mid-career professionals and managers in their 40s and beyond. There’s a drill. You polish your resume; you work your network; you apply for openings; you wait. All the while, you try to maintain your enthusiasm and self-esteem. In a society that worships the work ethic and treats jobs as an indicator of social status, being without one is…
  • The deleveraging of America

    Robert J. Samuelson
    9 Apr 2014 | 9:30 am
    The deleveraging of America is over, or mostly over — and that’s good news and possibly bad. All that “leverage” (loans, debts, mortgages) impeded recovery. Borrowers were overborrowed. Lenders were overlent. Credit standards were too lax. It would take time, we were told, for these excesses to shrink. Borrowers would pay down debts. Lenders would write off bad loans. But now that this ugly process seems mostly done, more money can flow into old-fashioned consumer and business spending. The recovery should strengthen. Read full article >>
 
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    George F. Will: Most Recent Articles and Archives

  • Barack Obama, the adolescent president

    George F. Will
    23 Apr 2014 | 5:02 pm
    Recently, Barack Obama — a Demosthenes determined to elevate our politics from coarseness to elegance; a Pericles sent to ameliorate our rhetorical impoverishment — spoke at the University of Michigan. He came to that very friendly venue — in 2012, he received 67 percent of the vote in Ann Arbor’s county — after visiting a local sandwich shop, where a muse must have whispered in the presidential ear. Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) had recently released his budget, so Obama expressed his disapproval by calling it, for the benefit of his academic audience, a “meanwich” and a…
  • Campaign speech case is regulatory overkill

    George F. Will
    18 Apr 2014 | 5:20 pm
    Occasionally, the Supreme Court considers questions that are answered merely by asking them. On Tuesday, the court will hear arguments about this: Should a government agency, whose members are chosen by elected officials, be empowered to fine or imprison any candidate or other participant in the political process who during a campaign makes what the agency considers “false statements” about a member of the political class or a ballot initiative? Read full article >>
  • Progressives are wrong about the essence of the Constitution

    George F. Will
    16 Apr 2014 | 5:18 pm
    In a 2006 interview, Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer said the Constitution is “basically about” one word — “democracy” — that appears in neither that document nor the Declaration of Independence. Democracy is America’s way of allocating political power. The Constitution, however, was adopted to confine that power in order to “secure the blessings of” that which simultaneously justifies and limits democratic government — natural liberty. Read full article >>
  • Michigan may be the GOP’s best answer to the ‘war on women’

    George F. Will
    11 Apr 2014 | 4:32 pm
    DETROIT Robert Griffin, now 90, who rose to be second in the Republican U.S. Senate leadership, was defeated in 1978. Since then, only one Michigan Republican, Spencer Abraham in 1994, has been elected to the Senate and for only one term. Evidence that former Michigan secretary of state Terri Lynn Land might end this GOP drought is that Democrats are attacking her for opposing “preventive health care.” Read full article >>
  • D.C.’s shadow delegation: It’s not the money, it’s the strategy

    George Derek Musgrove
    11 Apr 2014 | 3:35 pm
    Last week, D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray (D) released a budget for fiscal 2015 that contains $100,000 for the District’s shadow delegation to Congress, the city’s official statehood lobby. Though a pittance when compared with the $1.1 million that D.C. Council member Vincent Orange (D-At Large) proposed allocating for the same purpose last year, the budget line still would be unprecedented. The city has never directly funded the shadow delegation since the first elections for the positions in 1990. Read full article >>
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    Going Out Guide

  • Say, what can you see? Finding the best views of Washington

    Amy Orndorff
    24 Apr 2014 | 1:05 pm
    Washington isn’t home to the Empire State Building. Or the Sears Tower. Or the Space Needle. But we don’t need any of those, because we have something better. We have a monument. A 555-foot obelisk from which you can gaze toward the Capitol to the east and the Potomac River to the west. The Washington […]
  • D.C. area waterfront bars with views of more than waves

    Fritz Hahn
    24 Apr 2014 | 12:53 pm
    There's nothing better than relaxing with a cold beer outside -- unless it's relaxing with a cold beer near the water. Rooftop bars are fine, but I'd rather feel the breeze coming from downstream. Here are a few of my favorite waterfront bars where you can sip a drink while also enjoying panoramic views of […]
  • ‘The Intergalactic Nemesis’ brings the noise to Artisphere

    Maura Judkis
    24 Apr 2014 | 10:30 am
    The play puts a comic book on stage in the tradition of old-time radio dramas. [Read more]
  • Avey Tare’s Slasher Flicks at U Street Music Hall

    Alex Baldinger
    24 Apr 2014 | 9:59 am
    Recuperating at home, Dave Portner of Animal Collective found respite in another new kind of sound. [Read more]
  • 11 things to do in the D.C. area on the weekend of April 25-27

    Lavanya Ramanathan
    24 Apr 2014 | 9:18 am
    The weekend’s best in nightlife, music and art. For even more, check out Nightlife Agenda. Through Sunday: The Fossil Hall at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History is closing for a five-year, $48 million makeover on April 28. So take a walk through what is one of the Smithsonian’s most popular exhibits one last time before the skeletons are […]
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    Carolyn Hax: Latest Carolyn Hax Articles, Carolyn Hax Archive

  • Carolyn Hax: A shared tragedy forever changes aunt-nephew relationship

    Carolyn Hax
    23 Apr 2014 | 8:59 pm
    Adapted from a recent online discussion. Hi, Carolyn: After the sudden death of my brother and his wife, I’m the brand-new guardian of my 13-year-old nephew. We’re both in therapy to adjust to the changes and the kiddo is in grief counseling with some other kids his age, too. Read full article >>
  • Carolyn Hax: Girlfriend may be a real catch, but she also may be a bit too bossy

    Carolyn Hax
    22 Apr 2014 | 8:59 pm
    Dear Carolyn: I have someone wonderful in my life. We’ve been living together for almost three years, and she wants to get married in a year. Things are great, but from time to time I wonder if she’s just a little on the bossy side. She’s two years older than I am, well-traveled and very focused. Our relationship really benefits from her maturity. Read full article >>
  • Carolyn Hax: Marriage, kids, house — they’re not a package deal

    Carolyn Hax
    21 Apr 2014 | 8:59 pm
    Adapted from a recent online discussion, and continued from yesterday. Dear Carolyn: I agree with you that I shouldn’t be more focused on “checking the box” [of marriage] than on enjoying Boyfriend himself; I’ll cop to having a bit of box-checking anxiety. Marriage is something that’s valued highly among my friends and family, and, as indicated, I’m among the last to get there, and the anxiety does mount exponentially. Read full article >>
  • Carolyn Hax: Weddings bring out the worst in an unmarried couple

    Carolyn Hax
    20 Apr 2014 | 8:59 pm
    Adapted from a recent online discussion. Hi, Carolyn: Bit of an introvert here, all tuckered out from wedding season. My friends mainly got married one to three years ago, so we’re now onto attending the weddings of my boyfriend’s closest friends. Read full article >>
  • Carolyn Hax: High-strung grandparents plus active kids equals vacation stress

    Carolyn Hax
    19 Apr 2014 | 8:59 pm
    Hi, Carolyn: My boys are 4 and 6 and very high-energy, though well behaved for their ages. My parents don’t live nearby, and now that they’ve finally retired, they want to plan a week-long family vacation along with my childless brother and his wife. Read full article >>
 
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