Washington Post

  • Most Topular Stories

  • Paul Ryan’s stale ideas on poverty

    Today's Opinion Columns
    E.J. Dionne Jr.
    27 Jul 2014 | 4:59 pm
    Paul Ryan is counting on this: Because he says he wants to preserve a safety net, speaks with concern about poor people and put out a 73-page report, many will elide over the details of the proposals he made last week in his major anti-poverty speech. Read full article >>
  • One of the most anti-Obama ads of the election is being run by a Democrat in West Virginia

    The Fix
    Chris Cillizza
    28 Jul 2014 | 9:44 am
    It's not easy being a Democrat in West Virginia these days.  President Obama is deeply unpopular in the state -- thanks, at least in part, to his recent push to cut emissions at coal plants. Natalie Tennant, the party's longshot nominee for the state's open Senate seat knows it-- and in her first ad of the […]
  • Gov. O’Malley is all talk, no action, on immigrant children

    Washington Post Editorials: Latest Editorial and Editorial Archive
    Editorial Board
    27 Jul 2014 | 4:25 pm
    FEW GOVERNORS have spoken with more passion and eloquent conviction than Maryland’s Martin O’Malley (D) about the plight of tens of thousands of underage, unaccompanied and undocumented Central American immigrants who have crossed the southwestern border in recent months. His actions tell a different story. Read full article >>
  • Obama failed to stop the Islamic State when he had the chance

    Today's Opinion Columns
    Marc A. Thiessen
    28 Jul 2014 | 6:28 am
    From Europe to the Middle East, we have seen how disaster follows U.S. retreat and disengagement from the world. But the one area where President Obama seemed to be leaning forward was drone strikes. He personally approved terrorist “kill lists” and has taken out many hundreds of terrorists with drones in Pakistan, Yemen and East Africa. Read full article >>
  • Pesticides can prevent Lyme disease only if used

    Local Letters
    27 Jul 2014 | 4:22 pm
    Regarding “No tick spraying in parks,” Metro, July 17: This month, Loudoun County decided to forgo using pesticides at public parks and properties to combat Lyme disease. While we applaud the county for providing Lyme disease prevention education, it should not dismiss the value these products may play in reducing exposure. Read full article >>
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Fix

  • One of the most anti-Obama ads of the election is being run by a Democrat in West Virginia

    Chris Cillizza
    28 Jul 2014 | 9:44 am
    It's not easy being a Democrat in West Virginia these days.  President Obama is deeply unpopular in the state -- thanks, at least in part, to his recent push to cut emissions at coal plants. Natalie Tennant, the party's longshot nominee for the state's open Senate seat knows it-- and in her first ad of the […]
  • Fifteen percent of candidates running in the Alaska primary are named Dan Sullivan

    Jaime Fuller
    28 Jul 2014 | 9:35 am
    For primary candidates, it's essential to help voters differentiate between you and a pool of people with similar ideological underpinnings and policy ideas. If you are running in Alaska this year, it is also essential to help voters differentiate between you and the other GOP candidate named Dan Sullivan. And yes, this is a problem that […]
  • Cheer up, President Obama! The worst of the criticism is (probably) over.

    Philip Bump
    28 Jul 2014 | 8:47 am
    Conservative pundit Erick Erickson has had enough. The "disastrous policies" of President Obama, he writes, are "premised not in incompetence, but in maliciousness." This comes as Republicans (and Democrats) hand-wring over impeachment, and former Alaska governor Sarah Palin launches some sort of Internet TV network to offer her insights on just how bad Obama is […]
  • America really is two different political countries these days

    Chris Cillizza
    28 Jul 2014 | 8:27 am
    I wrote my newspaper column today on a theme I started exploring in the Fix last week: The idea that America -- and American politics -- are fundamentally adrift, caught between an old way of doing things that they know is broken and an uncertain future that feels too far away to grasp right now. […]
  • John Oliver on how to mend U.S./Russia relations: Rescue the lizard sex satellite

    Aaron Blake
    28 Jul 2014 | 6:58 am
    John Oliver, ever the peacemaker, has an idea for uniting a fractured world behind a common cause: rescuing the Russian satellite sent to space to observe gecko mating habits in zero gravity — a.k.a. the "lizard sex satellite." That's right, Oliver wants the world to #GoGetThoseGeckos, and he's calling on you to join him.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Washington Post Editorials: Latest Editorial and Editorial Archive

  • Gov. O’Malley is all talk, no action, on immigrant children

    Editorial Board
    27 Jul 2014 | 4:25 pm
    FEW GOVERNORS have spoken with more passion and eloquent conviction than Maryland’s Martin O’Malley (D) about the plight of tens of thousands of underage, unaccompanied and undocumented Central American immigrants who have crossed the southwestern border in recent months. His actions tell a different story. Read full article >>
  • U.T. Austin’s affirmative action program is a careful effort to ensure diversity

    Editorial Board
    27 Jul 2014 | 4:25 pm
    LAST YEAR, the Supreme Court ordered the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit to reconsider the affirmative-action program at the University of Texas at Austin. This month, the appeals court determined again that the university’s admissions policies were constitutional. This was not much of a surprise: The 5th Circuit sided with the university the last time it examined this case. Much less predictable is how the Supreme Court will rule when the dispute comes before the justices for a second time. Read full article >>
  • Hype over Census Bureau STEM report is overblown

    Editorial Board
    27 Jul 2014 | 4:24 pm
    THE UNITED States’ shortage of scientific workers used to be undisputed. Graduates with scientific training are employed at a substantially higher rate than the national average. They’re also harder to find: Science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) job openings take twice as long to fill as other ones. Read full article >>
  • Why the U.S. should end the death penalty

    Editorial Board
    26 Jul 2014 | 4:27 pm
    THE STATE of Arizona executed Joseph R. Wood III on Wednesday. For those Americans who, as we do, consider the death penalty to be a dehumanizing punishment unworthy of our advanced society, that sentence should be enough to elicit profound moral discomfort. Then there was the way it happened: Executioners pumped Mr. Wood with a two-drug regimen meant to lull him toward death peacefully and quickly. Instead, he remained alive for nearly two hours, gasping and snorting, as his lawyer frantically appealed to a judge to call off the botched execution. Read full article >>
  • The immigration crisis solution: A Plan Honduras

    Editorial Board
    26 Jul 2014 | 4:26 pm
    IT IS increasingly fashionable in both political parties to imagine that the United States can retreat or retire from global responsibilities, with few consequences for itself. Nothing demonstrates the folly of such thinking better than the desperate crowd of Central American kids at the southern U.S. border. This migratory chaos is the consequence of a decade of mounting social and political disorder in their home region, to which the U.S. response has been mostly benign neglect. Read full article >>
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Today's Opinion Columns

  • Obama failed to stop the Islamic State when he had the chance

    Marc A. Thiessen
    28 Jul 2014 | 6:28 am
    From Europe to the Middle East, we have seen how disaster follows U.S. retreat and disengagement from the world. But the one area where President Obama seemed to be leaning forward was drone strikes. He personally approved terrorist “kill lists” and has taken out many hundreds of terrorists with drones in Pakistan, Yemen and East Africa. Read full article >>
  • Dodd-Frank’s Achilles’ heel

    Robert J. Samuelson
    27 Jul 2014 | 4:59 pm
    Four years after Dodd-Frank became law, the question being asked is whether the country is safe from another financial crisis. It’s the wrong question. It presumes that major financial crises are routine events. They’re not. What happened in 2008-2009 was the first in the United States since World War II. This sort of calamity requires much stupidity, incompetence and bad luck. With or without the Dodd-Frank financial overhaul, the next one might be many years or decades away. The right question is: When a crisis occurs — as it probably will — does Dodd-Frank better prepare us to…
  • Paul Ryan’s stale ideas on poverty

    E.J. Dionne Jr.
    27 Jul 2014 | 4:59 pm
    Paul Ryan is counting on this: Because he says he wants to preserve a safety net, speaks with concern about poor people and put out a 73-page report, many will elide over the details of the proposals he made last week in his major anti-poverty speech. Read full article >>
  • Obama’s foreign policy reveals the effects of disengagement

    Fred Hiatt
    27 Jul 2014 | 4:58 pm
    A stunning unfolding of international crises, from Iraq to Ukraine to Syria to Gaza, has prompted some less-than-edifying Washington debate: It’s all President Obama’s fault. No, it’s not his fault at all. Read full article >>
  • Russia’s message to the E.U.: Money talks

    Anne Applebaum
    25 Jul 2014 | 4:39 pm
    David Cameron, the British prime minister, led the attack: It would be “unthinkable” for the British to sell a warship to Russia, he declared. Almost immediately, the French president, François Hollande, confirmed his intention to do precisely that: He would, he said, deliver a Mistral amphibious assault ship to the Russian navy, as contracted — and then he hit back hard. “This is a false debate led by hypocrites,” one of his party colleagues declared. “When you see how many [Russian] oligarchs have sought refuge in London, David Cameron should start by cleaning up his own back…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Local Letters

  • Pesticides can prevent Lyme disease only if used

    27 Jul 2014 | 4:22 pm
    Regarding “No tick spraying in parks,” Metro, July 17: This month, Loudoun County decided to forgo using pesticides at public parks and properties to combat Lyme disease. While we applaud the county for providing Lyme disease prevention education, it should not dismiss the value these products may play in reducing exposure. Read full article >>
  • Manassas ‘sexting’ case is ripe for discussion

    27 Jul 2014 | 4:21 pm
    Regarding “Va. ‘sexting’ case reignites debate” [Metro, July 25]: The failure to demonstrate appropriate sexual boundaries is astounding. In this case, in which a 17-year-old was charged with producing child pornography (of himself), every conversation that could educate minors about consent and sexual conduct has been lost in the squabble over legal jargon. Read full article >>
  • Washington Redskins has no defense for keeping its offensive name

    27 Jul 2014 | 4:21 pm
    That Jordan Wright, granddaughter of George Preston Marshall, has spoken out against the Redskins’ name and urged officials to change it [“Family ties don’t bind her to team’s name,” Metro, July 24] strikes at the heart of the team’s defense of keeping a racial slur as the name of the NFL team in the nation’s capital: “It’s tradition.” Read full article >>
  • D.C. fracking rally deserved coverage

    25 Jul 2014 | 3:59 pm
    I was dismayed to find no coverage in The Post of the large anti-fracking rally and march July 13 near the Capitol . Many well-known local, national and international groups (including Chesapeake Climate Action Network, 350.org, Food & Water Watch, the Sierra Club and Interfaith Power & Light) sponsored and/or participated in the event. Read full article >>
  • People, not disabilities, first

    25 Jul 2014 | 3:58 pm
    While it was heartbreaking to read about the two Montgomery County men who spent nights locked in their parents’ basement, I also found it disheartening to see the absence of person-first language in the headline and throughout the article [“Autistic twins locked in room are moved,” Metro, July 23]. Those two men, who suffered extraordinarily, should be recognized as people first and not be defined by their disability. Perhaps the sadness of the story would have been conveyed more poignantly had the twins’ personhood not been undermined by their disability. Read full article…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Achenblog

  • Where have all the animals gone?

    Joel Achenbach
    24 Jul 2014 | 11:01 am
    Here’s a phrase to remember: the Anthropocene defaunation. That’s a fancy way of saying that the animals are disappearing. Humans already did their worst in the Pleistocene, wiping out many of the largest terrestrial animals on Earth (mammoths, mastodons, ground sloths, giant camels, glyptodonts, saber-toothed cats, gomphopheres, stag moose, giant short-faced bears, the North American […]
  • Secrets of happiness

    Joel Achenbach
    22 Jul 2014 | 9:26 am
    Sometimes when I’m sitting in my cubicle at work, under the fluorescent lights, I realize that it’s been a long time since anyone called me “swashbuckling.” No matter. This is the life I have chosen, happily, freely, without regret, because the world needs the laborers and functionaries who keep the machinery going so that other […]
  • It feels like flying just got a little bit more dangerous

    Joel Achenbach
    18 Jul 2014 | 11:46 am
    Flying just got a little bit more dangerous. That’s how this moment feels. I’m writing this on an airplane, looking at the words stitched into the back of the seat in front of me: Fasten Seat Belt While Seated. And thinking of the people found Thursday in that Ukraine field, some of them still buckled […]
  • Is Miami Beach drowning?

    Joel Achenbach
    16 Jul 2014 | 5:56 am
    We learn from the Guardian newspaper that the front line in America’s battle against climate-change-induced sea level rise is Miami Beach, and specifically the area along Alton Road. I have fond memories of Alton Road — of cruising down that winding boulevard in my 1964 Cadillac convertible, livin’ large, lookin’ goofy. I worked in the […]
  • Carl Sagan denied being an atheist. So what did he believe? [Part 1]

    Joel Achenbach
    10 Jul 2014 | 5:49 am
    Every so often I get an e-mail out of the blue about two sentences in a story published in The Post in 1996. I quoted Carl Sagan: “An atheist has to know a lot more than I know. An atheist is someone who knows there is no God.” People who contact me want to know […]
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Anne Applebaum: Most Recent Articles and Archives

  • Russia’s message to the E.U.: Money talks

    Anne Applebaum
    25 Jul 2014 | 4:39 pm
    David Cameron, the British prime minister, led the attack: It would be “unthinkable” for the British to sell a warship to Russia, he declared. Almost immediately, the French president, François Hollande, confirmed his intention to do precisely that: He would, he said, deliver a Mistral amphibious assault ship to the Russian navy, as contracted — and then he hit back hard. “This is a false debate led by hypocrites,” one of his party colleagues declared. “When you see how many [Russian] oligarchs have sought refuge in London, David Cameron should start by cleaning up his own back…
  • The Malaysia Airlines crash is the end of Russia’s fairy tale

    Anne Applebaum
    18 Jul 2014 | 11:57 am
    Before there is any further discussion of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, it’s important that one point be made absolutely clear: This plane crash is a result of the Russian invasion of eastern Ukraine, an operation deliberately designed to create legal, political and military chaos. Without this chaos, a surface-to-air missile would not have been fired at a passenger plane. Read full article >>
  • Welcome to Free Kiev

    Anne Applebaum
    11 Jul 2014 | 4:51 pm
    WARSAW Last month, Andrei Kuznetsov left his native St. Petersburg and flew to Ukraine. When he arrived at the Kiev airport, he asked for political asylum. The bemused guards, unaccustomed to any sort of asylum-seekers, let alone Russian asylum-seekers, couldn’t figure out what to do with him. Finally, he told a Radio Liberty reporter, “they let me in as a tourist and gave me the link to a U.N. site with procedures for applying for asylum.” Read full article >>
  • The last democratic World Cup?

    Anne Applebaum
    12 Jun 2014 | 6:11 pm
    Like a time-honored ritual, the run-up to any world-class sporting event is always the same. A few months before, the stadiums aren’t ready and the hotels have no hot water. The highways are dirt tracks and the athletes have nowhere to sleep. The local newspapers predict calamity. Will the beach volleyball final not be held for lack of a net? Will the qualifying match between Paraguay and Ivory Coast be abandoned because the referees couldn’t land at the unfinished airport? Read full article >>
  • Europe is seeing a East-West clash of values

    Anne Applebaum
    30 May 2014 | 5:02 pm
    WARSAW By any measure, it was a landmark, landslide victory — for Europe. On May 25, Petro Poroshenko declared victory in the first round of the Ukrainian presidential election. He had won more than 55 percent of the vote — and Ukrainians knew exactly what they were getting. Poroshenko campaigned on integrating his country into European institutions. After his victory, he repeated that goal. Ukraine is on the brink of financial catastrophe and is fighting a de facto invasion: Well-armed Chechen soldiers have now arrived to assist the Russian-made insurgency in the east. Yet in his victory…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Richard Cohen: Most Recent Articles and Archives

  • Richard Cohen: A fight for Israel’s existence

    Richard Cohen
    21 Jul 2014 | 4:29 pm
    Israel fought its first war, in 1948, against five Arab nations — Egypt, Iraq, Lebanon, Syria and Jordan — as well as the Palestinians. In the prediction of the fairly new CIA, the outcome was never in doubt: “Without substantial outside aid in terms of manpower and material, they [the Jews] will be able to hold out no longer than two years.” It has now been 66 years, but I fear that sooner or later, the CIA’s conclusion could turn out to be right. Read full article >>
  • Carrying a gun into a congressional building, as the Founders intended

    Richard Cohen
    21 Jul 2014 | 7:08 am
    Why they arrested Ryan Shucard last week, I shall never know. All he did was bring your basic 9mm Smith & Wesson handgun into the U.S. Capitol (actually, the Cannon House Office Building), upon which, in clear violation of what the Founders intended — right, Justice Antonin Scalia? — he was seized and later had to appear in D.C. Superior Court where, thank God, he was eventually released pending a forthcoming hearing. If Shucard has any guts — and I’m not saying he doesn’t — he would cease insisting that the whole thing was an accident and instead assert a right to enter the…
  • Conservatives will buy anything if it’s about the Clintons and Obamas

    Richard Cohen
    14 Jul 2014 | 5:05 pm
    They had a term for her, but I’ve forgotten it. It was a name applied to a person who could not say no to a door-to-door salesman. The one I remember from my brief career selling magazines was totally upfront about her intentions. “I’ll buy whatever you’re selling,” she said. I sold her Esquire and two other subscriptions. Salesmen back then had a name for such people. Today, I would call them conservatives. They, too, will buy anything. Read full article >>
  • On Wall Street, the Corleone family fits right in

    Richard Cohen
    7 Jul 2014 | 5:32 pm
    FADE IN: Michael Corleone’s den. He is at his desk. Facing him are members of his organization. Michael rises and dims the lights. He starts a PowerPoint display showing the various Mafia families. The chieftains and button men are puzzled but they say nothing. Michael turns the lights back on. It is clear he is about to say something important. Read full article >>
  • The tea party would rather burn than submit to Washington

    Richard Cohen
    30 Jun 2014 | 5:05 pm
    A friend of mine worked for a small-town newspaper years ago and had to write the weather report. The county fair was approaching, but the prediction was for rain. So the editors, fearing the wrath of local merchants, ordered my friend to change “rainy” to “sunny.” That was the newspaper’s policy. It has since been adopted by much of the Republican Party. Read full article >>
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    E.J. Dionne Columns and Blog Posts

  • Paul Ryan’s stale ideas on poverty

    E.J. Dionne Jr.
    27 Jul 2014 | 4:59 pm
    Paul Ryan is counting on this: Because he says he wants to preserve a safety net, speaks with concern about poor people and put out a 73-page report, many will elide over the details of the proposals he made last week in his major anti-poverty speech. Read full article >>
  • Will Flight 17 sober us up?

    E.J. Dionne Jr.
    24 Jul 2014 | 1:00 pm
    Tragedies concentrate the mind. U.S. politics was trundling along on its usual unserious and trivial trajectory when news of the crash of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 in Ukraine shook the world. Suddenly, the stakes in public life and foreign policy were very high. Read full article >>
  • A conservative judiciary run amok

    E.J. Dionne Jr.
    23 Jul 2014 | 5:26 pm
    Retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens captured our ideal when he wrote of the judge as “an impartial guardian of the rule of law.” By effectively gutting the Affordable Care Act on Tuesday, two members of a three-judge panel on the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals showed how far right-leaning jurists have strayed from such impartiality. We are confronted with a conservative judiciary that will use any argument it can muster to win ideological victories that elude their side in the elected branches of our government. Read full article >>
  • Can you be a pro-business populist?

    E.J. Dionne Jr.
    16 Jul 2014 | 5:09 pm
    Here’s the thing to watch in this year’s campaign: Democrats are trying to be populists and pro-business moderates at the same time. The tea party’s success in transforming the Republican Party is making this two-step possible as conservatism’s increasingly ferocious opposition to government creates points of friction with both business and middle-class constituencies. Read full article >>
  • Bordering on heartless

    E.J. Dionne Jr.
    13 Jul 2014 | 4:40 pm
    Glenn Beck says he has come under fierce attack from some of his fellow conservatives for a grave transgression. His crime? He announced plans to bring food, water, teddy bears and soccer balls to at least some of the tens of thousands of Central American children who have crossed the border into the United States. Read full article >>
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Michael Gerson: Most Recent Articles and Archives

  • Lois Lowry’s ‘The Giver’ makes one serious summertime movie

    Michael Gerson
    17 Jul 2014 | 5:49 pm
    In 1993, Lois Lowry wrote a slim book for youth about totalitarianism, euthanasia, suicide, sexual awakening and infanticide. “The Giver” created a blooming genre — the dystopian youth novel — and considerable controversy. Some parents wanted the book banned from schools, thus unintentionally re-asking the book’s central question: How comprehensively should children (and other humans) be protected from risk and pain? Read full article >>
  • Corrupting citizens for fun and profit

    Michael Gerson
    14 Jul 2014 | 5:08 pm
    Two of the larger social trends of our time — the growth of payday gambling and the legalization of marijuana — have two things in common: They are justified as the expansion of personal liberty, and they serve the interests of an expanding government. Read full article >>
  • The tea party risks scaring away voters

    Michael Gerson
    10 Jul 2014 | 4:56 pm
    A few recent developments have revealed the tea party temperament in its most distilled, potent form. Former Republican vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin called for the impeachment of President Obama on the theory that his border policies are “the last straw that makes the battered wife say, ‘no más.’ ” Excavating the layers of mixed metaphor — the straw that broke the camel’s back is somehow causing an abused woman to surrender in Spanish — Palin demands the ousting of an American president on the constitutional theory that “enough is enough.” Read full article…
  • The divided states of Obama

    Michael Gerson
    7 Jul 2014 | 5:33 pm
    The headline — “Poll: Obama worst president since World War II” — was both provocative and misleading. The Quinnipiac University survey did, indeed, place President Obama at the top of the worst since FDR. But this was largely a measure of partisan concentration. Republicans were united in their unfavorable historical judgment of Obama. Democrats divided their votes (and would insist, I’d imagine, that they have more options to choose from). Read full article >>
  • Declaring equality and living equality are two different things

    Michael Gerson
    3 Jul 2014 | 5:27 pm
    On July 9, 1776, when the Declaration of Independence was publicly read to the citizens of New York City — “We hold these truths to be self-evident ” — they responded by decapitating an equestrian statue of King George III, cutting off his nose and placing his head on a spike outside a tavern. Metal from the statue was later turned into 42,088 bullets, intended, by one account, “to assimilate with the brains” of the British. Read full article >>
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    David Ignatius: Most Recent Articles and Archives

  • In Afghanistan and Iran, John Kerry brings some reasons for hope

    David Ignatius
    24 Jul 2014 | 5:26 pm
    The world has been so chaotic lately that it was easy to overlook two U.S. diplomatic maneuvers — involving the turbulent nations of Afghanistan and Iran — that avoided what could have been dangerous ruptures. Read full article >>
  • Review: “A Spy Among Friends: Kim Philby and the Great Betrayal,” by Ben Macintyre

    David Ignatius
    24 Jul 2014 | 2:00 pm
    By now, the story of British double agent Harold “Kim” Philby may be the most familiar spy yarn ever, fodder for whole libraries of histories, personal memoirs and novels. But Ben Macintyre manages to retell it in a way that makes Philby’s destructive genius fresh and horridly fascinating — and to me, at least, ultimately inexplicable. In an age when every puzzle is thought to have its solution, Philby’s inner motivation remains unfathomable. Read full article >>
  • The U.S. and Germany are rebuilding a spy partnership

    David Ignatius
    22 Jul 2014 | 5:13 pm
    Given recent German indignation about the National Security Agency, it has been easy to overlook the fact that for decades the German government has cooperated extensively with the NSA on surveillance activities. But after a high-level meeting in Berlin this week, this long-standing but veiled cooperation may have a firmer legal and political base. Read full article >>
  • How to break Hamas’s stranglehold on Gaza

    David Ignatius
    21 Jul 2014 | 2:16 pm
    What goal is Israel pursuing in its latest war in Gaza? That has been a hard question to answer, as Israel expanded its war aims from seeking “quiet” from Hamas rocket attacks to closing tunnels to destroying rocket-launch sites in northern Gaza. Read full article >>
  • The risk of tougher sanctions on Russia

    David Ignatius
    17 Jul 2014 | 5:46 pm
    Energy politics underlie the explosive Ukraine crisis, as Europeans weigh U.S. calls for tougher sanctions against the ability of Russia to disrupt gas supplies this winter. The dilemma for European governments increased this week as the Obama administration announced strong new penalties against the Russian energy and financial sectors. Europe’s initial response was tepid, in a sign that many of its governments fear Moscow’s energy leverage more than U.S. displeasure. Read full article >>
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Ruth Marcus: Most Recent Articles and Archives

  • Supreme Court may not protect Obamacare this time

    Ruth Marcus
    24 Jul 2014 | 11:44 am
    Don’t be so sure that the Supreme Court is going to save Obamacare. Again. The question is enormously important: Are health-care consumers entitled to subsidies if they buy coverage on insurance exchanges established by the federal government, as they are with insurance from state exchanges? Read full article >>
  • A lesson for the White House in anonymous sources

    Ruth Marcus
    22 Jul 2014 | 5:10 pm
    Let us now praise anonymous sources. The new White House press secretary got into a familiar old spat with the White House press corps the other day over the use of anonymous sources. Josh Earnest — has there ever been a more perfectly named White House spokesman? — was a bit off in his timing. He lit into The Post — and noted, more than once, that its reporters were absent from the briefing — for its alleged overuse of unnamed sources. Read full article >>
  • Sarah Palin is right about impeaching President Obama

    Ruth Marcus
    15 Jul 2014 | 5:26 pm
    Sarah Palin is right about impeaching President Obama. No, not that the president should be impeached. But Palin is correct in arguing that, for those who assert that Obama has grievously abused his executive authority, impeachment is the proper course of action. Read full article >>
  • Ruth Marcus: Spared from hatred, thanks to a bullet in the back

    Ruth Marcus
    11 Jul 2014 | 4:52 pm
    The Israeli soldier shot Yousef Bashir in the back in the front yard of his father’s house in Gaza. It was Feb. 18, 2004, a week after Yousef’s 15th birthday. The bullet splintered into three fragments, severing nerves near the teenager’s spine. Read full article >>
  • Hillary Clinton’s lawyerly past

    Ruth Marcus
    8 Jul 2014 | 5:11 pm
    It should not be necessary to write this column. Lawyers represent clients. Criminal defense lawyers represent clients accused of crimes — sometimes horrible, evil clients accused of heinous crimes. It is the ethical and professional responsibility of these lawyers to defend those clients as vigorously as possible. Read full article >>
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Harold Meyerson: Most Recent Articles and Archives

  • Schumer offers flawed solution to gridlock

    Harold Meyerson
    23 Jul 2014 | 5:28 pm
    Would the dysfunction of U.S. politics be dispelled if we got rid of partisan primaries? That’s the contention of Sen. Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.). In an op-ed for the New York Times, Schumer argued that the primary system in most states, in which voters choose nominees for their respective parties who then run head to head in November, gives too much weight to the party faithful, who are inclined to select candidates who veer either far right or far left. The cure Schumer proposes for this ill is the “jungle primary,” in which all primary candidates, regardless of party, appear on the…
  • CIA might as well learn from Germany’s economy while spying

    Harold Meyerson
    16 Jul 2014 | 5:09 pm
    As long as U.S. intelligence agencies are hell-bent on spying on Germany, why can’t they turn up some truly useful secrets? For instance, how to have an economy that bolsters a nation’s power and fosters a vibrant middle class. Read full article >>
  • Hillary Clinton’s identity crisis

    Harold Meyerson
    9 Jul 2014 | 5:39 pm
    Which Hillary Clinton would run for — and, more important, govern as — president? The onetime New York senator whom many Wall Street bankers supported and former secretary of state who gave speeches to Goldman Sachs and others for a reported $200,000 per? Or the leader of an increasingly progressive Democratic Party, who, in an interview with the German magazine Der Spiegel this week, affirmed the thesis of economist Thomas Piketty? “I think he makes a very strong case that we have unbalanced our economy too much towards favoring capital and away from labor,” she said. Read full…
  • When dollars trump democracy in China

    Harold Meyerson
    2 Jul 2014 | 4:47 pm
    That was quite the demonstration by the citizens of Hong Kong on Tuesday — half a million protesters, by some estimates, braving tropical downpours to tell the Politburo in Beijing that they wanted to choose their own leaders. Though China’s top officials had pledged to allow Hong Kong “a high degree of autonomy” when the British handed the colony over to China in 1997, a government white paper released three weeks ago stipulated that a committee controlled by supporters of the Chinese Communist Party would determine who could run in 2017 for the post of chief executive. Read full…
  • The U.S.’s exceptionally bad support for parental leave

    Harold Meyerson
    25 Jun 2014 | 5:46 pm
    On Monday, President Obama provided more fodder to critics who contend he’s no fan of American exceptionalism. In a speech to a White House conference on working families, he lamented the fact that the United States was the one developed nation that doesn’t provide paid maternity leave. Read full article >>
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Eugene Robinson Columns and Blog Posts

  • Israel is acting as if it is free of moral responsibilities.

    Eugene Robinson
    24 Jul 2014 | 5:50 pm
    The civilian death toll in Gaza from Israel’s latest incursion is appalling. The right to self-defense is inalienable, but it is not free from moral constraints. As of this writing, nearly 750 Palestinians, including dozens of children, have been killed since the Israeli assault began. On Thursday, a compound housing a United Nations school — crowded with Gaza residents who had fled their homes to seek shelter — was shelled in an incident still under investigation by the Israeli Defense Forces. Palestinian officials said 15 people were killed and scores injured. Read full article…
  • The downside of giving weapons to rebels in Ukraine or Syria

    Eugene Robinson
    21 Jul 2014 | 4:30 pm
    The bodies and debris that rained from the Ukrainian sky offer a cautionary lesson about the danger of giving heavy weapons to non-state actors. I hope the hawks who wanted President Obama to ship anti-aircraft missiles to the Syrian rebels are paying attention. Read full article >>
  • Peace may never be at hand

    Eugene Robinson
    17 Jul 2014 | 5:45 pm
    Israelis and Palestinians may someday make peace. But the assumption should be that it won’t happen soon — perhaps not in our lifetimes. How often have we seen this movie? Palestinian atrocity, Israeli reaction escalating into overreaction, rocket attacks aimed at civilian targets in Israel, airstrikes targeting Palestinian leadership and infrastructure in Gaza, heartbreaking pictures of mangled young bodies on the beach. Palestinians say: We will never forgive the Israelis for killing our children. Israelis say: We will never forgive the Palestinians for forcing us to kill their…
  • Republicans rant but offer no solutions

    Eugene Robinson
    14 Jul 2014 | 5:09 pm
    Apparently there’s a contest among Republicans to see who can be more shameless and irresponsible in criticizing President Obama’s foreign policy. So far, Chris Christie is winning. The New Jersey governor alleged Saturday that “the unrest you see in the Middle East is caused in some measure — not completely, but in some measure — by the fact that this president has not acted in a decisive, consistent way.” Read full article >>
  • An overriding need for immigration reform now

    Eugene Robinson
    10 Jul 2014 | 4:55 pm
    There’s no objective need for President Obama to visit the Texas-Mexico border and see the immigration crisis firsthand, but he shouldn’t have claimed that “I’m not interested in photo ops.” The line about photo ops was so absurd that it’s a good thing he wasn’t under oath. Every president since Abraham Lincoln has been interested in photo ops. Posing for the cameras amid artfully chosen people and props is something presidents do every day. Obama is very good at it, and there are times when he actually gives the impression that he enjoys it. Read full article >>
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Robert Samuelson: Most Recent Articles and Archives

  • Dodd-Frank’s Achilles’ heel

    Robert J. Samuelson
    27 Jul 2014 | 4:59 pm
    Four years after Dodd-Frank became law, the question being asked is whether the country is safe from another financial crisis. It’s the wrong question. It presumes that major financial crises are routine events. They’re not. What happened in 2008-2009 was the first in the United States since World War II. This sort of calamity requires much stupidity, incompetence and bad luck. With or without the Dodd-Frank financial overhaul, the next one might be many years or decades away. The right question is: When a crisis occurs — as it probably will — does Dodd-Frank better prepare us to…
  • Making corporate tax dodgers patriotic

    Robert J. Samuelson
    23 Jul 2014 | 8:55 am
    Corporate America’s latest public relations disaster comes under the banner of “tax inversion.” In an inversion, a U.S. company shifts its legal headquarters to a country with a lower tax rate. Just last week, the U.S. drug maker AbbVie agreed to buy a foreign firm, Shire, in part to reduce its corporate tax rate, which is expected to drop from 22 percent to 13 percent. In most inversions, companies keep their headquarters’ physical activities — the people, the buildings — in the United States, as would AbbVie. Still, the practice has understandably provoked a furious backlash.
  • Budget policy as prayer

    Robert J. Samuelson
    20 Jul 2014 | 4:46 pm
    The Congressional Budget Office last week issued one of its periodic long-term budget outlooks. Its themes are distressingly familiar. There is no balanced budget in sight. Under favorable assumptions, the CBO projects deficits of $7.6 trillion from 2015 to 2024. Under less favorable (maybe more realistic) assumptions, the added debt would total $9.6 trillion. The big drivers are an aging population and rising health spending. The deficits materialize despite slightly higher taxes and squeezed spending on defense and most programs — for transportation, law enforcement, education and much…
  • A part-timer boom, or blip?

    Robert J. Samuelson
    16 Jul 2014 | 8:34 am
    There may be a dark lining to the sunny June employment report, which recorded an increase of 288,000 payroll jobs for the month. Most — or all — of the increase may have been part-time jobs. If that’s a trend, it could signal a weaker economy. It could also vindicate critics of the Affordable Care Act (the ACA or Obamacare). They have argued that the added costs of providing health insurance for full-time workers would cause many firms to emphasize part-time employment. Read full article >>
  • The real Medicaid problem

    Robert J. Samuelson
    13 Jul 2014 | 4:43 pm
    The White House recently put out a 40-page report arguing that the 24 states that have not expanded Medicaid coverage under the Affordable Care Act (ACA or “Obamacare”) are hurting their poor and themselves. It’s an easy case to make, but it’s incomplete and misleading. The further truth is that Medicaid also threatens to crowd out spending for many traditional state and local functions: schools, police, roads, libraries and more. Read full article >>
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    George F. Will: Most Recent Articles and Archives

  • Oregon’s Monica Wehby may make a house call on the Senate

    George F. Will
    25 Jul 2014 | 4:37 pm
    PORTLAND, Ore. “Are you kidding?” This is Monica Wehby’s amiable response to people who wonder whether she will be able to bear the pressures of office if she wins her race as a Republican Senate candidate. For 17 of her 52 years she has been a pediatric neurosurgeon, holding in steady hands sharp steel and the fate of children’s brains. She probably can cope with the strains of legislative life. Read full article >>
  • Neel Kashkari could be California’s Goldwater

    George F. Will
    23 Jul 2014 | 12:26 pm
    MENLO PARK, Calif. Fifty Julys ago, up the road near San Francisco, in the unfortunately named Cow Palace, the Republican National Convention gave its presidential nomination to Arizona Sen. Barry Goldwater, who knew he would lose: Americans were not going to have a third president in 14 months. Besides, his don’t-fence-me-in libertarian conservatism was ahead of its time. His agenda, however, was to change his party’s national brand. Read full article >>
  • Ensuring nuclear fuel for Iran could put the country in a box

    George Perkovich
    10 Jul 2014 | 12:48 pm
    Uranium enrichment is the stickiest sticking point in the nuclear negotiations with Iran now underway in Vienna. The United States and its five partners want Iran to scale back the number and output of the centrifuges it operates and deploys in reserve, thereby extending the time it would take to “break out” and construct a bomb. Iran says it could delay expanding its enrichment capacity for a few years but ultimately needs to scale up to produce replacement fuel for its Bushehr nuclear power reactor. Iranian negotiators maintain that they can’t rely on Russia to continue supplying the…
  • The Supreme Court reins in government bullies

    George F. Will
    4 Jul 2014 | 4:42 pm
    Two 5 to 4 decisions this week, on the final decision day of the Supreme Court’s term, dealt with issues that illustrate the legal consequences of political tactics by today’s progressives. One case demonstrated how progressivism’s achievement, the regulatory state, manufactures social strife and can do so in ways politically useful to progressives. The other case arose from government coercion used to conscript unwilling citizens into funding the progressives’ party. Read full article >>
  • Unanimous Supreme Court comes at a cost

    George F. Will
    2 Jul 2014 | 4:51 pm
    Even when Supreme Court decisions are unanimous, the justices can be fiercely divided about fundamental matters, as was demonstrated by two 9 to 0 rulings last week. One overturned a Massachusetts law restricting speech near abortion clinics. The other invalidated recess appointments that President Obama made when the Senate said it was not in recess. In the first, four justices who concurred in the result rejected the majority’s reasoning because it minimized the law’s constitutional offense. In the second, four justices who concurred with the court’s judgment that Obama had…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Carolyn Hax: Latest Carolyn Hax Articles, Carolyn Hax Archive

  • Carolyn Hax: Figuring out what matters in a midlife ‘Is this all there is?’ crisis

    Carolyn Hax
    27 Jul 2014 | 8:59 pm
    Adapted from a recent online discussion. Hi, Carolyn: I’m in my mid-40s and I guess finally having my midlife crisis. After watching my friend’s husband die of brain cancer at 52, and a co-worker drop dead of a heart attack at 53, I’m acutely aware that life can change in an instant. I am happily married and have a young daughter, but seem to be wondering, “Is this all there is?” Read full article >>
  • Carolyn Hax: Seeking togetherness in a fractured family

    Carolyn Hax
    26 Jul 2014 | 8:59 pm
    Hi, Carolyn: I am 44 with five children, 12, 11, 10, 7, 6. I am the youngest of four siblings. All of my brother’s and sisters’ children are 16-32, some with children of their own. My dad passed away about four years ago and everyone sort of went their own way, even though we all live within 15 miles of each other. Read full article >>
  • Carolyn Hax: He has a steady girlfriend — and many other female friends

    Carolyn Hax
    25 Jul 2014 | 8:59 pm
    Adapted from a recent online discussion. Dear Carolyn: I’m a 27-year-old male in my first serious relationship since college. As a rule of thumb, how much do I need to scale back my friendships with women out of respect for my new girlfriend? She has never openly expressed jealousy but I can tell she does not always feel comfortable with the way I interact with other women. I have many female friends and am not willing to give them up completely. Read full article >>
  • Hax Philes: Getting to know yourself means asking some questions

    Carolyn Hax
    25 Jul 2014 | 9:34 am
    In response to Thursday’s letter, one reader pointed out how difficult it is to get to know yourself, especially after a breakup. She wrote, “Even in my 50s when I got divorced, I did not know what it meant to ‘get in touch with myself.’” Read full article >>
  • Carolyn Hax: Too much of a rush to reclaim a relationship

    Carolyn Hax
    23 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Dear Carolyn: I’m 26, he’s 27. Dated for about a year, fell hard and fast, moved in together after about six months and were beginning to talk about getting engaged. I thought I had found the one. But I messed up several times during the relationship and hurt him (never physically cheating, but being inappropriate with other men). Two months ago an incident happened that was the last straw, and he ended the relationship and moved out. Read full article >>
 
Log in